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Little Rock Nine

Rosalynn Carter Was Right

ilona saari | Posted 12.15.2016 | Politics
ilona saari

I was in elementary school the first time I became aware of "scare-tactic" politics. I came home to see my handsome, outgoing, kind-hearted father yel...

Showcasing Great Women

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 05.17.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Martha Graham's impact on the art of dance has been compared to the impacts of Stravinsky, Picasso and Frank Lloyd Wright to the fields of music, painting, and architecture, respectively.

Honoring the Dream: An Education Bill of Rights

Terry Blackhawk | Posted 03.20.2015 | Detroit
Terry Blackhawk

I hope our leaders can, as iO's mission states, "think broadly" enough to let go of rigid, behaviorist notions of what education means. I hope they will heed the many stories like this one that prove the dramatic, turn-around impact of the arts on "under-performing" schools.

LOOK: Black History Photo Of The Day

Posted 02.04.2013 | Black Voices

A picture is certainly worth a thousand words. And what better way to celebrate Black History Month than by taking a moment to acknowledge the snapsho...

Dad, Do You Know Ruby Bridges?

Harold Ross | Posted 03.24.2013 | Black Voices
Harold Ross

I would have preferred my beautiful boy ask me a different question. Something like, "How did I get inside mommy's stomach when I was a baby?" As parent-child discussions go, Reproductive Biology is easier than race relations and the Civil Rights Movement.

Obama Presidency Lures Out Dormant Racism

Nicole Glass | Posted 07.03.2012 | Politics
Nicole Glass

The end of a racist nation cannot just come from an integration of races in schools, the workplace and politics. It must come from a very personal change in perception. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 changed the law, but it's the people that change a culture.

Little Rock. 1957. 2 Girls, 1 White, 1 African-American. 1 Curse. 1 Photo.

Jesse Kornbluth | Posted 12.06.2011 | Books
Jesse Kornbluth

American mass media and American politicians must surely believe we are credulous children, because they love to tell us bedtime stories. And then there's Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan.