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Mandatory Sentencing

Bill To Abolish Some Mandatory Prison Sentences Is Revived In Senate

Reuters | Posted 04.13.2015 | Politics

By Julia Edwards WASHINGTON, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Several U.S. senators from far-reaching ends of the political spectrum, including some...

Who Does How Much Homework: A Response to The Atlantic

Anna Leahy | Posted 01.23.2014 | Media
Anna Leahy

Too much homework is a problem, and the fast-approaching Common Core State Standards will probably make that situation worse. But there exist bigger problems in this world, too, and these overarching problems are not unrelated to who's doing how much homework.

Making Sense Of California Youth Sentences

Youth Radio -- Youth Media International | Posted 12.19.2012 | Impact
Youth Radio -- Youth Media International

By Sayre Quevedo For juveniles in California being sentenced for crimes, things just got a little more complicated. Proposition 21 requires mandatory...

See Something, Say Something

Marian Wright Edelman | Posted 08.29.2012 | Politics
Marian Wright Edelman

On June 25th, the U.S. Supreme Court in Miller v. Alabama banned mandatory sentences of life in prison without parole for juveniles. This is a major victory for children and for America and a giant step forward for justice for children. Until this week, America was the only country in the world to routinely condemn children as young as 13 and 14 to die in prison. Now about two thousand people who were sentenced to die in prison as juveniles have hope for a new hearing and a new sentence. While it is disappointing that the Court did not ban the practice outright, we must keep working toward justice for children and end the devastating Cradle to Prison Pipeline crisis that leads to marginalized lives, imprisonment, and premature death.

Mugging in Paradise

Ed Koch | Posted 04.23.2012 | New York
Ed Koch

Today, crime no longer the number one issue on people's minds, pressure has been building to reduce sentences and eliminate mandatory minimums imposed for many violent crimes.

Why Did Governor Haley Barbour's Pardons Cause Such A Backlash?

Molly M. Gill | Posted 03.20.2012 | Crime
Molly M. Gill

The last 30 years of sentencing policy may provide an answer. Getting "tough on crime" became popular among the public and politicians alike. We rejected the notion that a criminal could be rehabilitated.

The Moral Urgency of Crack Retroactivity

Julie Stewart | Posted 05.25.2011 | Politics
Julie Stewart

President Obama has reformed what many considered the most racially discriminatory sentencing policy in federal law. Now, he should do what is right -- apply the reform retroactively to all offenders.