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Medical Research

Why Dr. Oz Is So Popular

Georgianna Donadio, MSc, Ph.D., D.C. | Posted 04.21.2015 | Healthy Living
Georgianna Donadio, MSc, Ph.D., D.C.

In early 2015, the National Health Policy Conference was held in Washington D.C., Dr. Stephen Berkshire, member of the American College of Health Ca...

One-Click Care

Hilary M. Cain | Posted 04.20.2015 | Impact
Hilary M. Cain

As a person who works in the technology field, I believe wholeheartedly in the potential of technology to solve some of society's greatest challenges.

Our Pathetic War Against Cancer: Part III

Dr. Sten Odenwald | Posted 04.23.2015 | Politics
Dr. Sten Odenwald

You have a 1 in 2 chance of getting cancer in your lifetime, and a 1 in 4 of dying from it. With those odds in Las Vegas, you would be a winner all the time. So why do you NOT fervently support cancer research to literally save your life?

Remiss About Remission

Paul Stoller | Posted 04.13.2015 | Healthy Living
Paul Stoller

Greater cross-cultural awareness of the relationship of illness to well-being may compel us to pay more attention of the important life-changing quandaries of remission in addition to the physical and emotional dimensions of cancer diagnosis and treatment.

The Cold Reality That's Set In After Last Year's Ice Bucket Challenge

Dawn Q Landau | Posted 04.13.2015 | Fifty
Dawn Q Landau

While ALS has certainly gotten so much more focus than it would have otherwise, now that all the ice buckets from all the ice-bucket challenges have been emptied, those on the front line are still suffering, with too little funding and often with little company.

Here to Stay -- Living With Sickle Cell Disease

Noah Williams | Posted 03.19.2015 | Teen
Noah Williams

When I was six years old I had my first massive stroke. It blew out the two main vessels in my brain. After the stroke, doctors informed my parents that I would probably only live to be about nine years old. Today I'm 17.

New Study Finds Alarming Rise in Animals Used in Experiments

Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H. | Posted 03.02.2015 | Green
Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H.

It's truly troubling to think that in this day and age, the number of animals used in these inherently flawed experiments may be increasing. At the very least, we need much greater transparency. Our tax dollars pay for these animal experiments, and taxpayers deserve to know the truth.

How Animal Experiments Paved the Way for the CIA's Torture Program

Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H. | Posted 03.23.2015 | Science
Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H.

Many psychologists and psychiatrists are justifiably horrified at the central role members of their own profession have played in these torture experiments. Unfortunately, our biomedical profession has a long history of experimentation on humans.

Top 10 Medical Research Issues and Trends to Watch in 2015

Margaret Anderson | Posted 03.17.2015 | Science
Margaret Anderson

Academic research institutions are undeniably under duress. While some of it may be due to overbuilding research infrastructure during the years of doubling the National Institutes of Health budget, they are now dealing with a new normal of having to do more with less.

A Worthy New Year's Resolution for the New Congress

Mary Woolley | Posted 02.18.2015 | Politics
Mary Woolley

With few significant legislative achievements for science and innovation in the 113th Congress, we look to the new Congress to fuel the momentum needed for medical progress, summoning the political will necessary to speed scientific discovery and drug development.

We Need to be Better PrEPared

Robert Bolan, MD | Posted 01.16.2015 | Gay Voices
Robert Bolan, MD

By now, many of you may have seen the headlines or read news about what sounds like encouraging results, announced in late October, about two clinical trials of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) in gay and bisexual men.

Ebola Outbreak Highlights Struggle for Science in Africa and Inequalities in Global Health Research

Tamer Fouad, MD | Posted 12.31.2014 | Science
Tamer Fouad, MD

In part, the lack of research in "non-profitable" infectious diseases occurring in underprivileged countries has left threats like Ebola largely unaddressed. In addition, inequalities within the system of international scientific collaboration have hindered African researchers from leading the way against diseases ravaging their continent.

Increased Public Awareness Sparks Surge in Traumatic Brain Injury Research

Christopher King | Posted 12.30.2014 | Science
Christopher King

Between the battlefield and the athletic field, the topic of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been much in the news in recent years.

Brynn Duncan Is Allergic to the World -- And She's Still Managing to Make It A Better Place

Abby Norman | Posted 12.09.2014 | Women
Abby Norman

At just 20-years-old, Brynn has several serious chronic health conditions, one of which requires her to be one of the only people in the world to have a 24/7 Benadryl intravenous drip. But even though I've never met Brynn in real life, from miles and miles away I can feel the warmth, brilliance and hope that she is giving the world.

My OCD and Me

Marco Gonzalez | Posted 12.07.2014 | Healthy Living
Marco Gonzalez

To this day, I still catch myself closing the fridge door or turning off a light, and I'll pause and stare at it for a few seconds... telling myself that the door is closed or that the light is off.

When Alzheimer's Victims Suddenly 'Perk Up' Just Before Death -- What's Going On?

Stafford Betty | Posted 11.29.2014 | Healthy Living
Stafford Betty

Conventional brain science has no explanation. It has long assumed that as the brain goes, so goes the mind; for the brain is what gives rise to the mind. The return of mental clarity and memory in a brain ravaged by Alzheimer's is not supposed to happen. Yet it does in some cases.

Sam Stein

Lawmakers Try To Save Science Funding Amid Rush To Restore Defense Spending

HuffingtonPost.com | Sam Stein | Posted 09.20.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- As pressure builds among the hawks in Congress to get rid of budget limits on defense spending, liberals in the House are making sure th...

Despite Headlines, Ebola Doesn't Yet Register Strongly in the Scientific Literature

Christopher King | Posted 11.18.2014 | Science
Christopher King

The crisis of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, at this writing, continues to deepen, with the World Health Organization now reporting more than 3,600 cases, and deaths exceeding 1,800. And yet, despite the headlines and the notes of alarm, Ebola as a research topic remains a comparatively limited presence in the scientific literature.

Sam Stein

How A Failed Experiment On Rats Sparked A Billion-Dollar Infant-Care Breakthrough

HuffingtonPost.com | Sam Stein | Posted 09.18.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- At a research lab at Duke University Department of Pharmacology in 1979, a group of scientists sparked a major breakthrough in infant ca...

UKRO President Ken Kleinberg Hosts Annual Benefit for Research to End Kidney Disease

Marc A. Coronel | Posted 11.14.2014 | Impact
Marc A. Coronel

This past Friday, I had the privilege of attending a fundraising gala at the Beverly Hilton in support of the new USC (University of Southern Californ...

Promising Research Can't Stall for Lack of Funding

Judith A. Salerno | Posted 11.12.2014 | Impact
Judith A. Salerno

Cancer, Alzheimer's, ALS, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, and painful, chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease will only be overcome if we, as a nation, have the will and commitment to once again make funding the type of essential research that led to the eradication of polio in the U.S. such a high national priority.

Let's Ban The Phrase 'Studies Show' From Medical Lingo

Brian Secemsky, M.D. | Posted 11.12.2014 | Healthy Living
Brian Secemsky, M.D.

If we've read evidence supporting our management decisions, let's own it by truly referring to the literature. But if we are only vaguely aware of research that supports a questioned decision, without first taking time to read the evidence and/or supporting editorials and guidelines, let us not sugarcoat our lack of due diligence.

The More We Invest in Medical Research Now, the More Lives We Save, Improve for Generations

Nancy Brown | Posted 11.08.2014 | Healthy Living
Nancy Brown

Federal funding for medical research is trending down -- way down. And this is happening at a time when technology and innovation are trending up, which means we could be missing out on so many lifesaving and life-changing advancements.

What to Know Regarding Current Treatments for Ebola

Mount Sinai Health System | Posted 11.04.2014 | Healthy Living
Mount Sinai Health System

After more than a decade of vigorous research into the deadly Ebola virus, a handful of potential treatment therapies appear to finally be on the horizon.

Mental Illness: How the Victim's Families Suffer A Similar Faith

Olayiwola A. Alara | Posted 11.01.2014 | Healthy Living
Olayiwola A. Alara

While there is no known cure for a psychological disorder, there are a few medications that can assist to subdue the illness so the victims are not ...