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Too Big to Fail

Bernie Sanders: 'Not Acceptable' To Jail Young Pot Smokers And Let Big Bank CEOs Walk

The Huffington Post | Zach Carter | Posted 09.11.2015 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders isn't terribly impressed with a new Department of Justice pledge to get serious about wh...

DOJ Swears It Will Get Tough On The Next Wall Street Crash

The Huffington Post | Zach Carter | Posted 09.11.2015 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The Department of Justice is finally drawing the curtain on what may be its defining project of the Obama era: the refusal to prosecute...

Obama Administration Helps Wall Street Criminals Dodge Accountability

The Huffington Post | Shahien Nasiripour | Posted 09.01.2015 | Politics

Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase appeared to score a significant victory Tuesday after the Department of Housing and Urban Development suggested it won't ...

How The Obama Administration Is Helping Big Bank Felons

The Huffington Post | Shahien Nasiripour | Posted 08.11.2015 | Politics

With the blessing of the White House and the Justice Department, the Department of Housing and Urban Development is attempting to sneak through a...

The American People Deserve to Know Where Candidates Stand on Glass-Steagall

Dennis M. Kelleher | Posted 07.30.2015 | Politics
Dennis M. Kelleher

As the campaign continues, voters deserve to know whether each candidate supports reinstating a Glass-Steagall-like law or other concrete proposals that will protect America's hardworking families and take them off the hook for future bailouts.

Financial Reform Helping Protect Families From Another Devastating Crash

Dennis M. Kelleher | Posted 07.22.2015 | Politics
Dennis M. Kelleher

The facts of the crisis also make clear that the impacts did not know partisan boundaries. In fact, the economic wreckage from the 2008 financial crash hit every state in the country, regardless of whether the state voted for the Republican or Democratic candidate for President.

Financial Reform 5 Years Later: Promise Unfulfilled

Preeti Vissa | Posted 07.19.2015 | Politics
Preeti Vissa

It's been five years since President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank financial reform act on July 21, 2010, saying the law would "lead all of us to a stronger, more prosperous future." Despite some positive steps, that promise remains largely unfulfilled.

Dodd-Frank Turns Five

Douglas Holtz-Eakin | Posted 07.15.2015 | Business
Douglas Holtz-Eakin

Dodd-Frank turns five years old next week and the occasion merits a review of its success.

How Is Jamie Dimon Like a Smoker on an Airplane?

Lynn Parramore | Posted 06.18.2015 | Business
Lynn Parramore

Smokers selfishly pursued their own pleasure without facing up to the harm they were visiting on others. The rules offering a no-smoking section resemble the ineffective capital requirements that the industry lobbyists persuade regulators to adopt.

Why Presidential Candidates Are Talking About the Unique Threat Posed by Wall Street's Megabanks

Dennis M. Kelleher | Posted 06.16.2015 | Politics
Dennis M. Kelleher

The handful of Wall Street's sprawling too-big-to-fail "banks" pose a unique, dangerous threat to America's families, workers, financial system and economy, which their "hide and disguise" strategy tries to conceal.

Is Dodd-Frank Really Under Attack?

Douglas Holtz-Eakin | Posted 05.21.2015 | Business
Douglas Holtz-Eakin

Dodd-Frank is a sweeping regulatory initiative and there is no reason to believe that Congress got it right the first time around. It did not. But it is equally unrealistic to equate any small attempt to improve it as a wholesale assault on the desirable goal of avoiding a future financial crisis.

Michael McAuliff

Bernie Sanders Tries Again To Break Up Too-Big-To-Fail Banks | Michael McAuliff | Posted 05.12.2015 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said Wednesday that Congress probably lacks the will to challenge Wall Street, but nevertheless vowed to try...

If We Don't Fix the Banking House of Cards, It Will Fall on Us Again

Lynn Parramore | Posted 06.29.2015 | Business
Lynn Parramore

Anat Admati, who teaches finance and economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, is co-author of The Bankers' New Clothes, a classic account of the problem of Too Big to Fail banks.

Is There an Actual 'Too Big to Fail' List?

Kevin Price | Posted 06.26.2015 | Business
Kevin Price

Recently I was visiting with a friend of mine who happened to discuss a "too big to fail" list that the federal government has created and sanctioned....

Zach Carter

Elizabeth Warren Hammers The Endless Failures Of Wall Street Regulators | Zach Carter | Posted 04.15.2015 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) assailed the nation's top bank regulators on Wednesday for coddling Wall Street offenders and ducking th...

Zach Carter

General Electric Hands Dodd-Frank Its Biggest Victory Yet | Zach Carter | Posted 04.10.2015 | Politics

WASHINGTON --General Electric said Friday it will sell off most of its banking operations, an acknowledgment that the company needs to transform itsel...

Big Banks Abuse Consumers and Shake It Off

Jorge Newbery | Posted 05.30.2015 | Business
Jorge Newbery

When the US Justice Department announced last August that it was levying a $17 billion penalty against Bank of America for its role in bringing on the mid-2000s housing crisis, pundits said the sheer size of the fine would make all banks take notice.

The Republican Budget Opens Taxpayers' Wallets to Bail Out Wall Street - Again

Dennis M. Kelleher | Posted 05.25.2015 | Politics
Dennis M. Kelleher

The effort to repeal Orderly Liquidation Authority would be such a gift to the biggest Wall Street banks. Without that authority, Wall Street would be assured that no matter how big the risks they take, the American taxpayer could be forced to bail them out.

Shahien Nasiripour

Here's The Biggest Big Bank Mystery | Shahien Nasiripour | Posted 03.11.2015 | Politics

Some of the biggest U.S. banks think they’d fare much better in a severe economic downturn than the Federal Reserve forecasts. Their executives and ...

Davos & Disruption Done Right: In Praise of "Difficult Women" in Finance

Janine R. Wedel | Posted 04.07.2015 | Business
Janine R. Wedel

Women are still most definitely outsiders in places that matter, not least in finance. And we saw last fall what a Wall Street outsider can uncover, just the latest woman in finance to blow the whistle.

Meet the New HSBC ...

Andrew Perez | Posted 04.01.2015 | Politics
Andrew Perez

In her confirmation hearing this week to become the next U.S. attorney general, Loretta Lynch said that "no individual is too big to jail" and "no one is above the law." But, at least in one recent case in which Lynch was a key player, this may not be accurate.

Would an Attorney General Loretta Lynch End 'Too Big to Jail'?

Bartlett Naylor | Posted 03.29.2015 | Business
Bartlett Naylor

On Jan. 28, 2015, the Senate Judiciary Committee opens two days of hearings to consider President Obama's nomination of Loretta Lynch to be Attorney General of the United States. Here are some questions that senators should ask to make sure that size no longer shields a company from the rule of law.

Republicans and Wall Street Say, 'To Hell With Protecting the Public!'

Bill Moyers | Posted 03.22.2015 | Politics
Bill Moyers

[Banks] want to be able to do things their way, and that's very dangerous," MIT economist Simon Johnson tells me. "'Here we go again' -- I think that's the motto for this Congress."

How Wall Street Occupies America: Rising Debt and Runaway Inequality

Les Leopold | Posted 03.16.2015 | Business
Les Leopold

Between the New Deal and the 1970s, Wall Street was tightly controlled. Taxes on the wealthy were high, worker wages were rising, and debt levels on consumers, companies and government were low. After finance wriggled free from these regulations private and public debt exploded, wages stalled, taxes on the rich fell and inequality soared.

JP Morgan Chase, Bernie Madoff's $64.8 Billion Ponzi Scheme and Crime on Wall Street

Dennis M. Kelleher | Posted 02.18.2015 | Business
Dennis M. Kelleher

Despite a deep, close and extremely lucrative relationship that lasted decades, JP Morgan Chase wasn't even required to publicly disclose the information that detailed its complicity in Madoff's scheme, including how much money it made and how.