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Un Committee Against Torture

United Nation's Committee Against Torture Addresses Systemic Problems in US Law Enforcement and Justice Systems

G. Flint Taylor | Posted 02.21.2015 | Chicago
G. Flint Taylor

The CAT also addressed the death penalty and numerous systemic human rights violations within the prisons and jails of the U.S. adult and juvenile justice system.

UN Report Criticizes U.S. Record On Torture

AP | JOHN HEILPRIN | Posted 11.28.2014 | World

GENEVA (AP) — Police brutality, military interrogations and prisons were among the top concerns of a U.N. panel's report Friday that found the Unite...

Ali Watkins

U.N.: Obama Takes Torture Seriously? Give Us A Break

HuffingtonPost.com | Ali Watkins | Posted 11.15.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- America, the Obama administration says, takes its history of torture seriously. President Barack Obama outlawed the harsh practices of t...

Ali Watkins

Zero-Hour In Geneva: Will Obama Seal His Legacy On Torture?

HuffingtonPost.com | Ali Watkins | Posted 11.11.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- A U.S. delegation will be asked by a United Nations panel on Wednesday if it believes the international Convention Against Torture appli...

Vatican Must Comply With Anti-Torture Treaty, Says UN

AP | JOHN HEILPRIN and NICOLE WINFIELD | Posted 07.23.2014 | Religion

GENEVA (AP) — In a report that could expose the Catholic Church to new legal arguments by clerical sex abuse victims, a U.N. committee found Friday ...

UN Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture: Healing Survivors, Rebuilding Lives

Curt Goering | Posted 01.25.2014 | World
Curt Goering

U.S. support for the Voluntary Fund benefits torture survivor rehabilitation programs globally by its leadership, inspiring contributions and commitments from the international community to help survivors and their families heal and rebuild lives of dignity.

Calls for Justice for Ireland's Magdalene Women

Frieda Klotz | Posted 10.02.2011 | World
Frieda Klotz

Magdalene Laundries were penitential institutions for Irish girls who made mistakes. Often young women were sent to them by their families or by police. Census records show that these stays could last for anything from a couple of years to 70 years.