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Watts Riots

50 Years Later: Racial Outrage and the Importance of the 1965 Watts Uprising

Shaun Ossei-Owusu | Posted 08.21.2015 | Black Voices
Shaun Ossei-Owusu

As the country continues to deal with racial strife, fatal police encounters, and dogged economic inequality, the Watts protests has instructional value for advocates of racial justice and their adversaries. For the former, short-term improvements can prove to be fruitful and can be an important respite from the daily onslaught of racial oppression.

50 Years Later, These 12 Photos Of The Watts Riots Speak Volumes

The Huffington Post | Taryn Finley | Posted 08.17.2015 | Black Voices

Los Angeles reached its boiling point on August 11, 1965. Racial tensions in the predominantly black and economically downtrodden neighborhood o...

Watts: Fifty Years Later

Justin Frank | Posted 08.14.2015 | Politics
Justin Frank

Fifty years ago on August 11, 1965, simple definitions changed forever: racial hatred and violence were not solely the provenance of the South. Watts went up in flames and for the first time concerned white liberals from California could no longer point fingers at the former Confederate States. They -- no, we -- all had to look in the mirror.

Can 'Straight Outta Compton' and the #BlackLivesMatter Movement Truly Co-exist?

Touré Roberts | Posted 08.14.2015 | Black Voices
Touré Roberts

With the recent crisis in our nation surrounding police impropriety, violence and even murder, is our nation ready for the re-popularization of the music that gave us the "F-ck The Police!" chant?

Moving Los Angeles

Joel Epstein | Posted 09.07.2015 | Los Angeles
Joel Epstein

Changes in the way we think about mobility is continuing to happen in Los Angeles because the old models of moving people around the region are severely limited and are not doing the trick for a growing number of us.

50 Years After the Watts Riots, the Original Black Lives Matter Protest

Rep. Janice Hahn | Posted 08.12.2015 | Politics
Rep. Janice Hahn

The Watts Riots took place fifty years ago, but I remember them vividly. I was thirteen years old, and on the morning of August 12, 1965, I woke up at Pepperdine University where I stayed the night for church camp.

Remembering Watts: 50 Years After the Riots That Shook the Nation, What Lessons Must Still Be Learned

Andre Shashaty | Posted 08.11.2015 | Politics
Andre Shashaty

Fifty years later, Americans of all races and incomes must look back at the upheaval that started in Watts with new eyes and face the warnings all around us that our progress has not been sufficient, and that we are slipping into racial division that could once again lead to hatred and violence.

James Madison's Warning to Rogue Police Departments

Benjamin A. Davis | Posted 04.19.2015 | Black Voices
Benjamin A. Davis

It is about race. And wariness of bad police officers stretches throughout the entire African American community whether we talk about lawyers or stone cold thugs. We are united in knowing that we are targeted by some law enforcement because of race.

Woman Whose Arrest Triggered 1965 Watts Riot Dies

AP | Posted 06.23.2013 | Black Voices

LOS ANGELES -- The woman who intervened when an officer pulled over one of her sons, leading to a racially-charged scuffle that set off the 1965 Watts...

Pioneering Los Angeles Times Writer Dies

AP | Posted 03.21.2012 | Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES -- Dorothy Townsend, the first female staff writer for the Los Angeles Times' city section and the lone woman on a team of dozens of repor...

Forty-Five Years After the "Watts Riot", King Hospital Remains Crucial to Healing the Lingering Wounds

Mark Ridley-Thomas | Posted 05.25.2011 | Los Angeles
Mark Ridley-Thomas

Forty-five years ago this week, an explosion of violence set Los Angeles aflame, in a rebellion against centuries of racism that would be burned into American history as the "Watts Riot."

Black History Month in Los Angeles. Anybody Notice?

Ronald Ricker | Posted 05.25.2011 | Los Angeles
Ronald Ricker

The unemployment rate in Los Angeles for African Americans is nearly 20%. They are a huge pool of people who are able and want to work. Los Angeles owes them and I want to keep them here.