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World War I

ISIS Crisis: Is Obama About to Reverse One of His Worst Decisions?

William Bradley | Posted 08.27.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

President Barack Obama is at last signaling that he may be ready to reverse one of his most foolish and perplexing stances. That is his refusal to strike against ISIS in Syria because it would aid the Assad regime in continuing to exist.

Global Problems Call for Global Solutions

Lawrence Wittner | Posted 10.26.2014 | World
Lawrence Wittner

Sometimes, amid the heated political debate about what should done by the U.S. government in world affairs, a proposal cuts through the TV babble of the supposed experts with a clear, useful suggestion.

7 Fascinating But Forgotten Facts From World War I (NEW BOOK)

Allegra Jordan | Posted 10.26.2014 | Home
Allegra Jordan

American soldiers didn't get condoms; British soldiers didn't get boots.

100th Anniversary of WWI - DOX Front Line Exhibition (PHOTOS)

Olena Kagui | Posted 10.21.2014 | Arts
Olena Kagui

"In 1914 the Great War began... and has lasted ever since." This quote can be found at the DOX Center for Contemporary Art in Prague the capital of the 'heart of Europe.'

A True-Life Love Story: What My Grandparents Taught Me About Devotion

Patricia Crisafulli | Posted 10.22.2014 | Fifty
Patricia Crisafulli

It started with a chance meeting: Richard Donohue Long, a tall, good-looking American soldier from Syracuse, New York, walked down a village street in France, just as Leone Sicre threw open a pair of wooden shutters to shake out a duvet cover. He ducked; she slammed the shutters closed.

Gospel Music: Evangelists and Their Song Leaders

William B. Bradshaw | Posted 10.09.2014 | Religion
William B. Bradshaw

The origin and development of Gospel music goes hand in hand with the history of evangelism in the United States. Dwight L. Moody, an evangelist of the mid-to-late 1800s, was the primary "architect" of a new kind of church music that has become what we now call Gospel Music.

Obama's Irrelevant Air Strikes

William Bradley | Posted 10.09.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

After months of temporizing analysis, President Barack Obama re-engaged militarily in the fading colonial construct known as "Iraq." That he has done so in limited fashion is to be commended, though the air strikes he has ordered so far are mere pinpricks.

August 2014

Neil McCarthy | Posted 10.07.2014 | Politics
Neil McCarthy

On the 100 year anniversary of the start of World War I, with children dying in the streets of Gaza and the world still blowing up at discordantly frequent intervals, I was thumbing through a book of poems by Wilfred Owen.

Doris Lessing's Post-Mortems: Depositing Memories of the War to End All War

Joseph Cooper | Posted 10.04.2014 | Home
Joseph Cooper

With patience amid disappointment, combined with respectful effort, the reader can come away with an appreciation for what a daughter had to witness, hear, and endure.

800,000 Red Poppies Pour Like Blood From The Tower Of London

The Huffington Post | Katherine Brooks | Posted 08.04.2014 | Arts

In honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, the historic Tower of London has been transformed by a massive art installation. Titled "Blood S...

These Posters Show How the Government Sold America on the First World War

Jia-Rui Cook | Posted 10.01.2014 | World
Jia-Rui Cook

How could you stand by and do nothing when you saw starving children and a (fictional) attack on New York City?

A Century of Mass Slaughter

William Astore | Posted 09.30.2014 | World
William Astore

This August marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I. That "Great War" was many things, but it was most certainly a war of machines, of dreadnought battleships and "Big Bertha" artillery, of newfangled airplanes and tortoise-like tanks.

WWI Liturgy Will Atone For Outbreak Of ‘The Great War'

Religion News Service | Kimberly Winston | Posted 07.27.2014 | Religion

(RNS) Half a world away from Europe, where World War I erupted 100 years ago next week (July 28), Washington National Cathedral will mark the occasion...

World War I Poets: An Interview With Alfred Corn

Jonathan Hobratsch | Posted 09.24.2014 | Home
Jonathan Hobratsch

Therefore, I've decided to focus on the great poets of World War I through an interview with Alfred Corn, a poet equally well-recognized in both America and in the U.K.

Early Animation: The Farmer in the City

Andrew J. Lederer | Posted 09.24.2014 | New York
Andrew J. Lederer

In truth, there are scores of mice in Farmer Al's cartoons (as in other Terrytoons), but they are not mighty. The mightiness is reserved for the more or less human character at their center, not mighty as a character -- he is an oft-besieged man -- but mighty as a star.

The Power of Religion to Restrain Conflict

Henry G. Brinton | Posted 09.22.2014 | Religion
Henry G. Brinton

Even in secular contexts, people of faith can work together to encourage or discourage warfare. As violence has escalated in Israel and Gaza, an international campaign for peace has been launched, involving Jews, Muslims, and Christians.

The Bonus Marchers Anniversary and Veterans in America

Roger Fisk | Posted 09.21.2014 | Politics
Roger Fisk

Veterans and patriotism are almost interchangeable, but peeling away the veneer reveals the conflicted relationship America has with its vets.

On the World War One Centennial, Revisiting the U.S. and Russian "Great War" Experience

David Reynolds | Posted 09.09.2014 | World
David Reynolds

Through our double vision of the two world wars, we learn something about the 20th-century past. We also learn a lot about our 21-century present.

Iraq, Syria, and Today's Other Killfests: The Great War as the Tragic Gift that Keeps on Giving

Doug Bandow | Posted 09.07.2014 | World
Doug Bandow

The morning of June 28, 1914 dawned bright for most Europeans. By sunset a geopolitical cataclysm loomed. World War I demonstrated the importance of saying no. Any of the great powers could have stopped the march toward war. America could have refused to join the parade after it started. The world would have been a better place had one or all done so. Today, Washington is filled with routine proposals for new interventions: bombing campaigns, foreign invasions, and military occupations. Most seem unlikely to trigger a new world war. But a century ago no one expected an assassination in a distant Balkan province to do so either. That is reason enough for Americans to make war truly a last resort.

World War I, Rather Than World War II, Is Key for U.S. Foreign Policy

Ivan Eland | Posted 08.30.2014 | World
Ivan Eland

The 100-year anniversary of the most important event in the 20th century passed recently with predictably scant notice in the American media.

The Man Who Ignited WWI Has A Nephew Who's Still Alive (And Other Crazy Great War Facts)

The Huffington Post | Nick Robins-Early & Michael Maisel | Posted 06.27.2014 | World

A hundred years ago on June 28, a young man named Gavrilo Princip fired at Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie during their visit ...

June 28, 1914: What a Difference a Day Makes

Ross M. Wallenstein | Posted 08.27.2014 | New York
Ross M. Wallenstein

The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand changed the world more dramatically than any other assassination in modern history. Similarly, the death of little Stanley Wallenstein on June 28, 1914 had a direct impact on my family.

Sarajevo 1914 and New York City 2001: Is It Happening Again?

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey | Posted 08.26.2014 | World
Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey

Sarajevo 1914 does not appear so distant, at least in terms of rhetoric and inclination to dehumanize the other. But, then perhaps our awareness has been raised to the danger.

If ISIS Is Such a Threat, Why No Air Strikes?

William Bradley | Posted 08.23.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

Have we learned nothing during our adventures in the Middle East and Central Asia?

What the History of the World Wars Can Tell Us About the Deeper Struggles at Work in Iraq

David Woolner | Posted 08.21.2014 | Politics
David Woolner

The tragic events unfolding in Iraq today are not all that dissimilar to what took place in the 1930s and '40s. Once again, we face an extremist ideology that is bent on conquest and has little respect for human life.