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Perry, Prayer, Politics and the Presidency

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Casual viewers of "The Response," including some political reporters who don't pay a lot of attention to the Religious Right, may have watched Texas Governor Rick Perry's prayer rally on Saturday and wondered what all the fuss was about. Most of the time was taken up with prayer and praise music. Few of the speakers seemed overtly political. Nobody used the occasion to endorse Perry's pending presidential bid.

But context is everything, and the context for this event was remarkable: a governor launching a presidential bid by teaming up with some of the nation's most divisive extremists to hold a Christians-only prayer rally that suggested Americans are helpless to solve the country's problems without divine intervention. Some media coverage is missing the boat: the issue wasn't whether it was okay for a politician to pray, or the size of the audience, but the purposes of the event's planners and their disturbing vision for America.

Organizers argued (unconvincingly) that "The Response" was about prayer, not politics. But groups like the American Family Association (AFA), which paid for the rally and its webcast, and organizations like the Family Research Council, whose president was among the speakers, are not designed to win souls but to change American law and culture through grassroots organizing and political power-building. They have a corrosive effect on our political culture by promoting religious bigotry and anti-gay extremism, by claiming that the United States was meant to be a Christian nation, and by fostering resentment among conservative evangelicals with repeated false assertions that liberal elites are out to destroy religious liberty and silence conservative religious voices.

By calling for this rally, and partnering with the far right of the evangelical world, Perry aligned himself with all these troubling strategies. When he drew criticism for the event and the extremism of its sponsors, Perry suggested his critics were intolerant of Christians. Speakers returned to the theme, with one of them declaring that "there is an attack on the name of Jesus." Such claims of anti-Christian persecution are a tried-and-true strategy of the Religious Right for rousing conservative Christians to political activism. And for those who actually believe that Christianity is on the verge of being criminalized in America, Perry's event defined him as a defiant and courageous defender of the faith.

As journalist Dave Weigel writes,

That's the brilliance of what Perry has done here.... He doesn't need to talk about politics, or do anything besides be here and understand this event. The religion is the politics. These worshipers understand that if they can bring 'the kingdom of God' to Earth, economic problems, even macroeconomic problems, will sort themselves out.

A major chunk of the day was given over to Mike Bickle, who runs the International House of Prayer (IHOP) movement, which recruits young people into "radical" devotion to prayer and fasting. Yes, he's the guy who said that Oprah is paving the way for the Antichrist. Bickle's associate Lou Engle has organized a series of stadium events pushing prayer, fasting, and politics under the banner of "The Call," which provided the model for "The Response." Bickle and Engle are hard-core dominionists who believe they are ushering in a new Christian church which will take its rightful place of dominion over every aspect of government and society. But in spite of their well-documented extremism, they are embraced by Republican leaders. Engle, for example, took part in a Family Research Council prayer-a-thon against health care reform, at which he introduced Rep. Michele Bachmann.

The Christian-nation crowd, like Response speaker David Barton and AFA spokesman Bryan Fischer, who says the First Amendment protects only Christians' religious liberty, shares a certain vision for America's future. Some of the political goals of "The Response" sponsors were brutally clear at the rally; a series of speakers prayed for an end to legal abortion. While rhetorical gay-bashing was surprisingly absent at an event whose sponsors include the most vehemently anti-gay groups in America (including the AFA, which has been designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center), it is clear that in the America envisioned by "The Response" planners, same-sex couples would have no chance at legal recognition or protection for their families. Shortly before the event, Perry himself was forced to walk back from his very brief flirtation with a states' rights defense of New Yorkers' decision to extend marriage equality to same-sex couples -- and to vow his support for a federal constitutional amendment that would strip married same-sex couples of their rights and make sure that in the future gay couples could not get married anywhere in the U.S.

And lest anyone think that Perry's religious agenda is limited to social issues, he made clear that a rigid conservative economic agenda was central to his spiritual mission. Just days before the rally, on The 700 Club, Perry said he'd be praying for "our country's economic prosperity. There just so many people that can't take care of their family because government's over-taxed, over-regulated, over-litigated, it caused roadblocks to economic prosperity." Those words echo the theology of activists like Barton, who have preached that the Bible condemns progressive taxation, the minimum wage and collective bargaining.

Perry is clearly positioning himself to enter the Republican presidential primary as a political savior to right-wing activists who are underwhelmed with their choices so far. Yet, oddly for someone who wants to be president, he insists that America's problems are beyond human ability to fix. (Sadly, that may only be true to the extent that enough legislators believe that God, like Grover Norquist, is opposed to any tax increases.)

Perry's worldview and that of "The Response" organizers seems to see no useful role for non-Christian Americans, whose religious beliefs were denigrated at "The Response." When Perry told Americans on Saturday that we, "as a nation," must return to God, it's clear he meant God as understood by the event's organizers. Jim Garlow, who organized anti-marriage equality pastors in California before being hired by Newt Gingrich to run one of his political groups, told journalist Sarah Posner on Saturday that "The Response" was "not about whether Perry becomes president, it's about making Jesus king." Perry used the event to let right-wing religious voters and churches nationwide know that for those who see politics as spiritual warfare, he is their warrior.

[Cross-posted on People For the American Way's Right Wing Watch.]

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