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Billions Wasted, Again: State Likely to Give Up on Costly Efforts to Train Iraqi Police

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The New York Times reports that the State Department, in the face of massive costs and Iraqi officials who say they never wanted it in the first place, slashed and may soon dump entirely "a multibillion-dollar police training program in Iraq that was to have been the centerpiece" of post-occupation US presence in Iraq. After all of five months.

In October I reported on my blog wemeantwell.com that the State Department was on Capitol Hill in front of the Subcommittee on National Security, Homeland Defense and Foreign Operations, begging a skeptical Congress for more money for police training in Iraq. "Training" was again being cited as the cure-all for America's apparently insatiable desire to throw money away in Mesopotamia. That latest tranche of taxpayer cash sought by State was one billion dollars a year, every year for five years, to pay police instructors and cop salaries in Iraq.

The U.S. has been training Iraqi cops for years. In fact, the U.S. government has spent $7.3 billion for Iraqi police training since 2003. Ka-ching! Anybody's hometown in need of $7.3 billion in Federal funds? Hah, you can't have it if you're American, it is only for Iraq!

Ever-reliable State Department tool Pat Kennedy led the pack of fibbers in asking Congress for the cash: "After a long and difficult conflict, we now have the opportunity to see Iraq emerge as a strategic ally in a tumultuous region." He went on (... and on) promising "robust this" and "robust that." Best of all, Pat Kennedy also said that providing assistance to the Iraqi police and security forces "will eventually reduce the cost of our presence as security in the country improves and we can rely on Iraqi security for our own protection." The Department spends several billion a year on private security contractors to protect the fortress-like Embassy in Baghdad (which itself carries almost a billion-dollar price tag, including the indoor pool and Embassy-only bar).

Don't Judge Us

Of course, despite the hoary promises by Kennedy of robust oversight and management of the police training program, State blocked inspectors from the U.S. government's independent auditor for Iraqi reconstruction, SIGIR, the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, from conducting an assessment of the Department's multibillion-dollar effort. Kennedy said: We're from the government, trust us.

The inspectors had good reason not to trust Kennedy and State:

Specifically, the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) bureau had come under fire from SIGIR for its management of the contract with DynCorp to train police in Iraq, Afghanistan and Jordan.

The last SIGIR audit of the State Department's "oversight of the contract concluded that 'INL lacks sufficient resources and controls to adequately manage the task orders with DynCorp. As a result, over $2.5 billion in U.S. funds are vulnerable to waste and fraud.'"

State's track record otherwise with police training also fails severely. The State Department in 2003 was given initial responsibility for training Iraqi police. By 2004, however, State's efforts were seen as so ineffective, even on an Iraq War scale, that police training was taken away from the suits and folded into the U.S. military mission.

Water Under the Bridge

But hey, those previously wasted billions and slapdash attempts to avoid scrutiny by an outside inspector are now like water under the bridge for the State Department, as the entire program is just about ready to collapse anyway.

The Times reports that the training cadre of about 350 American law enforcement officers was quickly scaled back to 190 and then to 100 as costs rose and Iraqi interest fell. State's latest restructuring calls for 50 advisers, but State Department officials say even they "may be withdrawn by the end of this year." Several colleagues of mine associated with the program report that they are not being asked to stay on, and in fact now rarely even leave their fortified compounds.

It seems the Iraqis simply do not care for the training State insists they should want. Last month many of the Iraqi police officials who had been participating in the training refused to attend the presentations given by the Americans, saying they saw little benefit. The Iraqis have also insisted that the training sessions be held at their own facilities, rather than American ones (the State Department spent $343 million building the facilities the Iraqis do not want to use, apparently without asking the Iraqis. The largest of the construction projects, at Baghdad Police College, "was recently abandoned, unfinished, after an expenditure of more than $100 million" of your tax dollars). The State Department will not allow the trainers to meet regularly at Iraqi facilities out of fear of terrorist ambush and the insane costs of moving people around Iraq safely. Private security contractors have to be hired by State to escort the private police contractors hired by State.

Failure to Ask = Failure

That part about asking the Iraqis what they want might have been key to the State Department's failure in Iraq police training.

Stalwart American Ambassador to Iraq Jeffrey, who is desperately seeking to curtail his assignment if State can find a successor whom Congress will endorse, mumbled "I think that with the departure of the military, the Iraqis decided to say, 'O.K., how large is the American presence here?' How large should it be? How does this equate with our sovereignty? In various areas they obviously expressed some concerns." "Some concerns," said Ambassador Jeffrey. Actually, the acting head of Iraq's Interior Ministry "questioned the wisdom of spending so much on a program the Iraqis never sought," the equivalent of shouting "Don't tase me bro!"

It's Always Sunny at Foggy Bottom

But don't think anyone is crying over spilled milk at Foggy Bottom. Thomas Nides, deputy secretary of state for management and resources told the New York Times, "I don't think anything went wrong. The Iraqis just don't believe they need a program of that scale and scope." Apparently Nides, Kennedy and no one at the State Department, none of the thousands of Americans State has in the World's Largest Embassy in Baghdad, thought to get the Iraqi opinion of the training program before committing billions of dollars. Next time I suggest think first, spend second, 'kay?

Note to Hillary Clinton: Before sending your drones to fib to Congress asking for money that should be spent here at home, and then wasting several billion dollars on a project in some foreign country, ask the foreigners if they actually want it first. If they do not want our help, how about returning the billions to the United States where we can sure put it to good use?

Note to Congress: The next time State comes asking for money, check if their lips are moving. That means they are lying to you. Please cut them off; they're like drunks loose in Vegas and can no longer help themselves. It'll be a mercy killing at this point.