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10 Ways to Stop Rankism in the Professional World

Posted: 06/30/10 07:12 PM ET

1. Work: Take the trouble to understand how co-workers contribute to getting the job done and acknowledge their contribution.
If you are a boss, it's not enough to avoid treating your employees in a rankist manner (though the example you set will reverberate through the entire organization); you are also responsible for making sure that your subordinates treat their subordinates with dignity. Dignitarian companies are not only happier workplaces, they are also healthier, more creative and more productive ones.

2. Education: Create "Indignity Free Zones."
Teachers are increasingly sensitive to the harm done to students by indignity. If you're an educator, you can bring this awareness into the open and communicate it to those students whose bullying and humiliation of peers unconsciously mirrors that of adult society. A threat to a student's dignity is more than a discourtesy. It is an attack on one's status in the "tribe," and carries an implicit threat of ostracism and exclusion. Status has historically been a matter of life and death and remains a determinant of whether we prosper or decline, so an attack on status is experienced as a threat to survival. Rankism poisons the learning environment.

3. Healthcare: Enlist your patients as partners.
If you are a healthcare provider, you can help your clients make the awkward transition from patients to partners. Ridding healthcare of its legacy of dehumanization and infantilization is good medical practice. You can also insist on respect throughout the organization in which you work. If you are a patient, have compassion for doctors, too. It's not easy to give up one's "deity status," and many physicians are doing so with remarkable grace. Moreover, remember that they're victims of rankism themselves at the hands of HMOs that often treat them less like the professionals they are and more like pieceworkers on an assembly line.

4. Sports: Have respect for the other team.
If you're a coach, you can forbid trash talk, on and off the court, among your players and to your opponents. Show your team that they are capable of more--not by humiliating them but by teaching and inspiring them. Rent the 1973 film Bang the Drum Slowly and show it to your athletes. Its punch line--"I rag on nobody"--puts it in the dignitarian hall of fame.

5. Religion: Exemplify rather than exhort.
If you're a religious leader, you can refrain from pulling spiritual rank. You can do more for your flock by listening and providing them with a personal example worthy of emulation than you can by invoking higher authority, which is often little more than a claim that God shares your politics.

6. Guardian professions (policing): Bring dignity to law enforcement.
If you're a policeman or woman, protect citizens' dignity as you already protect their lives. Any kind of profiling is rankism.

7. Military: One part of a strong defense is not giving offense in the first place.
Indignity is the source of indignation, so to avoid escalation or revenge, take care to spare your foes gratuitous indignities.

8. Politics: Restore civility to politics
If you're in electoral politics you can point the way to a dignitarian society, even if your colleagues aren't yet ready to embrace your ideas. Treat your opponents with dignity. Don't sneer, mock, or condescend. Avoid patronizing or posturing. When politicians lay claim to moral superiority, they extend rankism's lease. Since rankism is an attack on both liberty and dignity, denounce it along with the other "isms." Explain to your constituents why you're against it--in all its forms--and then go after them one by one. Be the leader you wanted to be when you first imagined running for office. Be willing to lose an election for your dignitarian convictions. If you do lose, run for office a few years later, and win! To paraphrase Victor Hugo, dignity is an idea whose time has come.

9. Other professions: Show the world dignity through your profession.
If you're an artist, expose rankism; put dignity on exhibit. If you're a philosopher, define and deconstruct dignity. If you're a psychologist, demonstrate the consequences of malrecogntion. If you're a comedian, make us laugh at the double standards that apply to somebodies and nobodies. If you're a filmmaker, give us heroes who overcome rankism without resorting to rankism. If you're a songwriter, write an anthem for the dignity movement. If you're a TV producer, stop exploiting humiliation and celebrating rankism. Sooner than you think, the staple of TV entertainment--humiliation--is going to feel as off-key as racism, sexism and homophobia do today.

10. Be a Susan B. Anthony of the Dignity Movement.
In the 19th century, Susan B. Anthony traveled a million miles by train and gave 20,000 speeches advocating the enfranchisement of women. Sadly, she did not live to see the success of the suffragette movement she spearheaded (but her image is on the dollar coin). If you're an organizer, create a chapter of the dignitarian movement in your area. Coordinate with other chapters and make them a national force under the slogan "no rankism" and the banner "dignity for all." Programs to help the poor or end poverty will continue to fall short until those trapped in the underclass have found their voice and together insist on respect and equity. Do what Susan B. Anthony did for women and Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. did for African-Americans: help the victims of chronic indignity find an effective way to give voice to their plight and change the status quo.

 
 
 

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