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Bates Motel Puts a New Twist on a Classic

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The great thing about a legend is that it never dies. Forty-three years after Alfred Hitchcock's cinema-changing film Psycho hit theaters for the first time, A&E debuts its new series Bates Motel, which digs deeper and expands on the unusual relationship between Norman Bates and his mother.

With an all-star cast led by Academy Award nominee Vera Farmiga (Up in the Air) as the mysterious and overbearing mother, Norma Bates, along with Freddie Highmore (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) as the infamous Norman Bates, Bates Motel gives audiences a thrilling and mysterious look into the life of the Bates family.

The series immerses audiences into the world Alfred Hitchcock so brilliantly brought to life 40 years ago, however it puts a new spin on this world. Instead of seeing who Norman Bates is, we see why he became the man he is in Psycho.

Although the series takes place in a modern society, the atmosphere is identical to that in Psycho, as there always seems to be a hint of sinister lurking around every corner. The set is brilliant, the house and motel mirror their 1960's counterparts and serves as a reminder to the audience that the show is not trying to redefine Psycho, but just expand on character's back stories.

In the pilot episode of the series, audiences get a short glimpse at the life of the Bates family prior to their motel owning days. However, the majority of the episode sheds light on the unusual relationship between Norman and his mother. Audiences expect to see Norman as the psychopath of the family; however his mother is given the more sinister spotlight in the series so far. The Norman Bates audiences see in this series is a teenage boy trying to live a normal life, but his mother's affection often gets in his way.

While some may be skeptical as to whether the show portrays these famous characters properly, the series proves to be a completely separate entity from Psycho, but equally as thrilling and entertaining. It will be interesting to see where the series continues from its pilot, but if the pilot is any indicator toward what is to come next audiences can expect a series with plenty of twists and turns.

Bates Motel premieres on A&E March 18 at 10/9c.