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Algorithms and the Filter Bubble Ruining Your Online Experience?

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Are there too many algorithms determining your online experience? Eli Pariser, author of The Filter Bubble: What the Internet is Hiding From You, joins our Real Time Conversation on the What's Trending Live show to talk about the algorithms that are changing how you surf the web. He is joined by panelists Chris Sacca, founder of LOWERCASE Capital/Twitter investor and Camera+ app co-founder, Lisa Bettany.

Pariser discusses how the bubble limits the amount of information received and makes varied information inaccessible to users. Without a diversity of opinion, people are left without perspective. In his book, he talks about how the filter bubble defies the first fundamental intention of the Internet, which is to allow full access to the world's information.

For anyone not in the business of being online, a filter bubble is the figurative sphere surrounding you as you search the Internet. Made possible by algorithms, the bubble keeps things that you have indicated interest in through clicking links, viewing friends, putting movies in your queue, reading news stories, etc. in the forefront of search results and advertising. Facebook, Google, Yahoo! News and Netflix are just a few of the sites that utilize algorithms to personalize what you see.

However, the bubble does create suggestions relevant to its user, and is designed to pique interest, making searches more relevant to its user.

You overwhelmingly responded to our poll against the idea of a filter bubble. In response to "do you think the customization of the web through a filter bubble is a bad thing?," 46 percent of you said "Yes, I don't want some algorithm customizing my experience." Forty-four percent said "I'd like the ability to create my own algorithm using a filter bubble and my own preferences," and only 10 percent of you were completely in favor of having filter bubbles.

What do you think? Do you like having what interests you show up first or do you feel that you aren't receiving a balanced amount of information?

Original post on CBSNews.com's "What's Trending"

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