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HealthFusion's Comments

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Five Percent Of Americans Account For Half Of Health Care Costs

Five Percent Of Americans Account For Half Of Health Care Costs

Commented Jan 18, 2012 at 19:23:51 in Business

“I believe that while the healthcare system may be expensive and cumbersome at the moment, the addition of technology in medicine will help to reduce costs, improve care, and streamline the system. One such example is the introduction of tablet PCs, especially iPads, and electronic health records into practices and hospitals (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ipad.asp). Also healthcare becomes digitized and more healthcare providers adopt EHRs, patient portals will be implemented much more. Patient portals allow patients to actively participate in their care, even away from the physicians office or hospital; eventually patient portals may eliminate the need for traditional doctor's office visits thanks to teleconferencing capabilities and other technologies (http://www.healthfusion.com/patient-portal.asp).”

shroomtune on Jan 18, 2012 at 19:49:46

“Yet the opposite seems to be the case. All the improvements we saw in technology in the last century did not seem to lower the cost. One could argue they just brought it up by finding ways to treat things we never could before.”

1dabut1 on Jan 18, 2012 at 19:38:42

“you are kidding right. it's like everything else, the big wigs will just put the money in their pockets.”
iPads Boost Doctors' Efficiency At University Of Chicago, Study Shows

iPads Boost Doctors' Efficiency At University Of Chicago, Study Shows

Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 18:47:48 in Healthy Living

“iPad tablet computers used in conjunction with electronic health records (EHRs) is the ideal solution for mobile health (mHealth) and the future of US healthcare (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ipad.asp). The study conducted at the University of Chicago proves that future physicans, such as the residents in the study, can improve their efficiency while also reducing redundant and time consuming tasks thanks to the Apple iPad. While many older physicians may still be hesitant to adopt tablet computers and EHRs, the doctors of tomorrow are certainly willing to try, and the results seem to speak for themselves. I have taken the liberty of continuing the discussion on the HealthFusion EHR Blog: http://blog.healthfusion.com/index.php/ehr-features/ipad-ehr/ipad-ehrs-and-emrs-improve-efficiency/
huffingtonpost entry

Electronic Medical Records Still Need Work, Report Says

Commented Jan 31, 2012 at 16:53:51 in Healthy Living

“While health information exchange (HIE) is the inevitable goal of (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-platform.asp)electronic medical records (EMRs), implementation must happen first. While HIPAA and CMS have helped with current EMR regulations, once full EMR adoption occurs by 2014, HIE will then become the focus for physicians and vendors alike. The United States does not want to run into the same problems faced by EMRs in England. And as emily comments, data exchange is a bad idea without proper security measures and laws in place across all EMRs, not just the prominent ones. Also, more EMRs must incorporate (http://www.healthfusion.com/patient-portal.asp) Personal Health Records (PHRs) and Patient Portals that allow patients access to their medical records, lab results, and even connect with their physician away from the office. Also as physicians continue to adopt mobile tablets, like the (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ipad.asp) iPad, EMRs will become far more prevalent.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Medications Seniors Can't Live With -- Or Without

Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 18:14:56 in Healthy Living

“Great article, and some good points. And definitely an issue that will only become more prevalent as the baby boomer generation continues to age. I believe your point about the electronic health records (EHRs) is a good one. Medication monitoring is a key element that can be incorporated into geriatric EHRs, and can be further boosted with the addition of a patient portal (http://www.healthfusion.com/patient-portal.asp). Patient portals can allow doctors to monitor and refill prescriptions without having to see the patient. Patient portals may also eventually eliminate the traditional doctor's office, with telecommunication and other smart technology.”
huffingtonpost entry

Top 10 Medical Research Trends to Watch in 2012

Commented Jan 6, 2012 at 17:10:57 in Healthy Living

“Your desire for electronic health records to be used for research, clinical trials, and epidemiology are already becoming a reality. The DOD is already looking to use their EHR data in this manner. The real concern is EHR security (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-data-security.asp) with the sharing and availability of all this patient data.

The other trend to watch in 2012 with electronic health records, is the involvement of the patient. EHR patient portals (http://www.healthfusion.com/patient-portal.asp) can allow patients access to their patient health record (PHR), begin their doctor visit at home (paperwork), request prescription refills, or potentially see their physician in the privacy of their own home (using video conferencing software).”
huffingtonpost entry

Little Privacy in Health Care -- Shame on Us

Commented Dec 29, 2011 at 13:52:28 in Healthy Living

“Discomfort at the doctor's office is not uncommon for many individuals, and I believe you are correct in stating that you must make your feelings known, and that can be said for any uncomfortable situation. However I fail to see the correlation to EHRs and HIPAA (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ehnac-hipaa.asp); HIPAA is meant to protect sensitive data and files, it should be up to your medical practitioner or institution and the patient to mandate changes to bedside manner. It just seems best that in any situation in which you find yourself uncomfortable, you make your feelings known.”
Most Patients Want To See Doctors' Notes: Study

Most Patients Want To See Doctors' Notes: Study

Commented Dec 29, 2011 at 13:49:04 in Healthy Living

“It really is only fair that patients be allowed to see their medical chart/information. However the points made by other commenters are true; doctors are a bit weary of allowing patients total access to encounter notes, for obvious reasons (reactions, time consuming explanations, misinformation, WebMD, etc.). The simple solution seems to be an electronic health record with a built-in Patient Portal (http://www.healthfusion.com/patient-portal.asp), that allows patients to view their personal health record (lab results, previous illnesses, and those types of things; not encounter notes) and even begin the encounter at home (filling out the usual paperwork on their personal computer), saving everyone's time. Eventually Patient Portals may make the traditional doctor's office visit a thing of a the past, thanks to video conferencing (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ipad.asp). I believe patients would feel appeased having their personal health record without having to wade through the minutia of how the physician arrived at their diagnosis (doctors are doctors for a reason -- medical school).”
huffingtonpost entry

Little Privacy in Health Care -- Shame on Us

Commented Dec 28, 2011 at 20:00:13 in Healthy Living

“Discomfort at the doctor's office is not uncommon for many individuals, and I believe you are correct in stating that you must make your feelings known, and that can be said for any uncomfortable situation. However I fail to see the correlation to EHRs and HIPAA; HIPAA is meant to protect sensitive data and files, it should be up to your medical practitioner or institution and the patient to mandate changes to bedside manner. It just seems best that in any situation in which you find yourself uncomfortable, you make your feelings known.”
Electronic Medical Records Rarely Encrypted: Expert

Electronic Medical Records Rarely Encrypted: Expert

Commented Nov 22, 2011 at 17:11:23 in Healthy Living

“I do not know why some electronic health record (EHR) providers are not encrypting their data. Accroding to the new HIPPA security rules, data should be encrypted: http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ehnac-hipaa.asp. As more and more medical providers adopt web-based, cloud computing EHRs (http://www.healthfusion.com/web-based.asp) security becomes even more important. As doctors transition from desktops to tablets, like the iPad (http://www.healthfusion.com/ehr-ipad.asp, for EHRs, data exchange will need to be even more secure.”
Where Is Our iCloud for Medicine?

Where Is Our iCloud for Medicine?

Commented Sep 21, 2011 at 18:12:32 in Technology

“The iCloud for medicine has been around for much longer than most people on here are claiming, it just took a company like Apple to really coin the cloud terminology. Prior to the cloud revolution, everything was web-based, it's just a fancier term for web storage. MediTouch EHR has been a certified web-based, iPad-native EHR, and we are now using Pure Cloud technology. While the cloud is the future, the future has been around much longer than people might think. Learn more about cloud (web-based) solutions: http://www.healthfusion.com/web-based.asp
huffingtonpost entry

How to 'Limit the Pain' of Electronic Health Records

Commented Aug 29, 2011 at 18:43:26 in Healthy Living

“Learn more about Electronic Health Records (EHRs), Practice Management, and Meaningful Use at one of the most informative blogs on the subject at http://www.healthfusion.com/blog.asp.