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PhilipCrabtree's Comments

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The 65 Business Words To Strike From Your Vocabulary Right Now

The 65 Business Words To Strike From Your Vocabulary Right Now

Commented Aug 10, 2013 at 12:16:16 in Small Business

“Bryan is wrong about a lot of these. First of all, he might try using punctuation to clearly separate his list. Secondly, he sure is overbearing. The goal of communicating (and language for that matter) is to be understood. If people understand through sports terms like "bring our A game" and "level the playing field", then the communicator is successful. Finally, many of these terms, as I just mentioned, are not business words at all. It's hard to strike them from a business vocabulary if they're not already included. This article has no validity except when it comes to speaking plainly, and where I'm from, people both play sports and love colorful language. They are hallmarks of interesting personalities.”
Denied Because I'm a Same-Sex Spouse? An Open Letter to the President of the Association of Bragg Officers' Spouses

Denied Because I'm a Same-Sex Spouse? An Open Letter to the President of the Association of Bragg Officers' Spouses

Commented Dec 13, 2012 at 22:53:24 in Gay Voices

“The federal government, and hence the military, does not recognize homosexual marriages. Your status is unchanged--not the spouse of a military officer. This can be further backed up by the fact that you don't qualify for a dependent ID card or benefits entitled to legally recognized spouses.

I would think an open letter to the Fort Bragg OSC would not be aired out here in the court of public opinion. That's not what military officers or their "spouses" do.”

BeauBoi on Jan 10, 2013 at 09:02:33

“Turns out your wrong. They announced today that they will be accepting same-sex spouses to the club. Forward.”

las Novios on Dec 14, 2012 at 09:48:03

“I think it might make a difference whether this is an actual branch of the military, or an independent support group. If the latter, then the mission to provide "support" to a military spouse is less a matter of legal recogntion than whether that group would be able to do something good for this person, and she for them, within the context of a partner-relationship even if not considered "marriage." Or, it's the right call legally, but the wrong call on the basis of simple human compassion.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 05:05:42 in Politics

“I've gotta tell you, Greg, the argument that certain things were not part of the military originally just doesn't hold water or do you much good. The chaplaincy was around from the inception of the country as opposed to some new creation. Additionally, tanks and airplanes weren't part of the originally Army, but we've got them now. Thank God we do.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 05:03:00 in Politics

“So tell me again how you believe the military is a secular organization as you've stated. I'd like to see that in a regulation. On the other hand, there are regulations, manuals, and doctrine specifically implemented for religious observances.

You still have not refuted me. Keep trying, but I'm going away for the weekend. Maybe that will give you some time to really dig a bigger hole.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 05:01:44 in Politics

“BLUF means "Bottom Line Up Front".

Let's walk through each of the definitions for secular that you used.

1. The military is indeed connected to religious things, and it shows throughout. For example, the caduceus used for the medical branch refers to the healing power of the snake Moses held up on a staff to heal Israelites. Even the 11th Infantry Regiment patch has a Bible verse on it "Follow Me".

2. The military is definitely connected with religion. The chaplaincy was created in 1775, before the establishment of the United States of America. Additionally there are regulations allowing for the wearing of religious symbols by all Soldiers as well as grooming standards for religious Soldiers. Conversely, there are also regulations prohibiting tattoos which discriminate against religion.

3. As far as education, we not only teach Soldiers about how they can obtain religious support, but we also train chaplains and chaplain assistants in the military. We also educate all Soldiers on the protection of religious sites during combat and operations other than war. We ensure we protect religious sites.

4. Clergy: There are no clergy that not affiliated with a religious order. It's a requirement to be endorsed by a religion or denomination in order to be a chaplain.

5. Religious services are held at least once a week on military installations and religious prayers are said often in conjunction with ceremonies of all kinds. We even use taxes to build chapels on every post.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 00:01:36 in Politics

“A stitch in time saves nine. I can throw out cute little adages as well. They serve no purpose.

I've proved nothing in the article to be correct. What I point out is that those bad behaviors committed by high and low profile people alike are secularist behaviors. Secularists believe adultery should not be a crime in the military, therefore the committing of adultery by a service member regardless of his faith is a secular behavior. The same is true for sexual harrassment, embezzling money, etcetera. Unlawful and immoral behavior is not a hallmark of the faithful. They are behaviors, however, of a secular mindset interested in nothing more than egoism and self pleasure. Jews, Muslims, Christians, Hindus, etc. all act contrary to what they profess, because no man is perfect. They realize this and seek to correct it. They secularist does not hold to the same types of moral codes, but they are just as ardent about believing in nothing.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 23:52:34 in Politics

“Talk about being wrong! Do you honestly think that if an organization is not religious the only other obvious choice secular or vice versa? I never said it was a religious organization. I merely pointed out how it is not a secular one.

Tell me what is the standard of conduct for secular people. Is it law? That's influenced by religion. Is it history? That's influenced by religion. Is it custom? That too is influenced by religion.

You've got to learn to do at least two things: 1) Actually read and/or listen to what people say, and 2) Separate what you don't like from what actually is. You can dislike what I say. You can wish it were different. But that doesn't change the way things actually are.

If the words "So help me God" are just meaningless utterances as you put it, what makes you think you don't regard the rest as meaningless utterances? You taint your own integrity by picking and choosing which parts of the oath you really mean or just say when your fingers are crossed behind your back. You must be one those types who have what are called "situational ethics", meaning you make it up as you go along and change your opinion at any given moment.

BLUF: You've proven nothing and failed to refute any of my statements.”

Stalling on Dec 9, 2012 at 02:52:38

“PhilipCrabtree the caduceus doesn't come from Moses brother. It comes from Greece. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caduceus

PhilipCrabtree on Dec 7, 2012 at 05:05:42

“I've gotta tell you, Greg, the argument that certain things were not part of the military originally just doesn't hold water or do you much good. The chaplaincy was around from the inception of the country as opposed to some new creation. Additionally, tanks and airplanes weren't part of the originally Army, but we've got them now. Thank God we do.”

PhilipCrabtree on Dec 7, 2012 at 05:03:00

“So tell me again how you believe the military is a secular organization as you've stated. I'd like to see that in a regulation. On the other hand, there are regulations, manuals, and doctrine specifically implemented for religious observances.

You still have not refuted me. Keep trying, but I'm going away for the weekend. Maybe that will give you some time to really dig a bigger hole.”

PhilipCrabtree on Dec 7, 2012 at 05:01:44

“BLUF means "Bottom Line Up Front".

Let's walk through each of the definitions for secular that you used.

1. The military is indeed connected to religious things, and it shows throughout. For example, the caduceus used for the medical branch refers to the healing power of the snake Moses held up on a staff to heal Israelites. Even the 11th Infantry Regiment patch has a Bible verse on it "Follow Me".

2. The military is definitely connected with religion. The chaplaincy was created in 1775, before the establishment of the United States of America. Additionally there are regulations allowing for the wearing of religious symbols by all Soldiers as well as grooming standards for religious Soldiers. Conversely, there are also regulations prohibiting tattoos which discriminate against religion.

3. As far as education, we not only teach Soldiers about how they can obtain religious support, but we also train chaplains and chaplain assistants in the military. We also educate all Soldiers on the protection of religious sites during combat and operations other than war. We ensure we protect religious sites.

4. Clergy: There are no clergy that not affiliated with a religious order. It's a requirement to be endorsed by a religion or denomination in order to be a chaplain.

5. Religious services are held at least once a week on military installations and religious prayers are said often in conjunction with ceremonies of all kinds. We even use taxes to build chapels on every post.”

Greg Papadatos on Dec 7, 2012 at 02:55:25

“PhilipCrabtree wrote: "You taint your own integrity by picking and choosing which parts of the oath you really mean or just say when your fingers are crossed behind your back. You must be one those types who have what are called 'situational ethics', meaning you make it up as you go along and change your opinion at any given moment."

Ah, the classic move! You can't prove me wrong, so you resort to ad hominem attacks. My integrity is "tainted", and I don't have consistent ethics. Well, THAT didn't take long!

As has already been pointed out, the phrase "so help me God" was not originally part of the Oath, and is no longer required.

When I first enlisted, I was a believer. When I last re-enlisted, I used that phrase, and at the time I meant it. The NEXT time I re-enlist, I will skip it. The oath will still be a representation of my true feelings and intentions, despite that omission.

Actions speak louder than words, Sir. My long and faithful service to the U.S.A., through good times and bad, shows more about my loyalty to this country than any unnecessary syllables in a spoken oath.

Oh, and by the way... I do not admire former-cadet Page. He is a quitter. He had a point to make, but he went about it in the wrong way.”

Greg Papadatos on Dec 7, 2012 at 02:41:23

“I don't know what "BLUF" means.

Let's look up the definition of the word "secular", shall we?

sec·u·lar [sek-yuh-ler] adjective
1. of or pertaining to worldly things or to things that are not regarded as religious, spiritual, or sacred; temporal: secular interests.
2. not pertaining to or connected with religion (opposed to sacred): secular music.
3. (of education, a school, etc.) concerned with nonreligious subjects.
4. (of members of the clergy) not belonging to a religious order; not bound by monastic vows ( opposed to regular ).
5. occurring or celebrated once in an age or century: the secular games of Rome.

Source: dictionary.com

By these definitions, the U.S. military absolutely IS a secular organization.

You wrote: "I never said it [the military] was a religious organization. I merely pointed out how it is not a secular one." Your statement is refuted.”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 10:06:14 in Politics

“That's funny, Aaron, and stupid (but then most things that are funny are also stupid).

I'll tell you what a phony Christian is. It's someone who professes to be one and then doesn't walk the walk. An officer who claims to be a Christian and then commits adultery is a phony, for example. Thankfully, in Christianity, there is forgiveness for what are commonly termed as "sins". Christians are not perfect, as I am sure you would like to point out.

There's nothing phony about me. You make assertions that are also just as ludicrous. Instead of responding to the issue of this soon-to-be civilian's blog, you want to bring up code words that are charged with hate like "prejudiced fundamentalist ideology" and likening Christians to the Taliban. You prove my point in likening Christians to terrorists--an absolutely wrong and absurd statement.

Prejudice is coming to a conclusion before you know the facts. You are predjudiced against me and call me things that are akin to racist taunts. So who really has been "Resisting slavery since 1966"? You're just seeking to be the new master. You've got the same ol' face, though. You just use a different whip.”

deh33 on Dec 7, 2012 at 14:36:56

“Slavery still exists in the US in the form of overrepresentation of the less populous states in the electoral college and senate, partial disenfranchisement of the residents of the District of Columbia and the five inhabited territories, and complete disenfranchisement of those under the age of 18, non-citizens, most felons and many ex-felons. Danny Handelman”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 09:42:05 in Politics

“Here you go, Greg. This is the oath of enlistment/oath of commissioned officers. As you can see by the reference at the end, it IS part of U.S. Code. That's the legal part of it. The most obvious means you can tell is just by looking. Every battalion level and bigger unit has a Chaplain sitting on each commanders staff and is part of the larger Chaplaincy branch--headed by a Major General.

"I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God." (Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962).

How do you arrive at the Army being a secular organization when the last statement you make as a civilian is an oath to God?

Secularism has no standard of conduct. It is part of the teleological philosophy of ethics which includes egoism and is more interested in the objective than the means used to achieve it. People who take oaths to God with no intent of keeping them to enter the military begin their careers with a lie.”

Greg Papadatos on Dec 6, 2012 at 17:31:09

“You are SO wrong, Sir, that I hardly know where to begin.

"Secularism", as you refer to it, in't properly any kind of "-ism" at all. "Secular" merely describes things that are not religious in nature.

The charge that people who embrace non-religious of "secular" lifestyles have "no standard of conduct" is an old one, and a conceit of religious people. There is no absolute requirement to be religious in order to have standards, ethics, or morals. Many non-religious people have VERY high standards, and live by moral and ethical standards that greatly exceed those of the religious people surrounding them.

The phrase "So help me God" does not make an atheist into a liar just because he (or she) utters them. It merely makes the words into meaningless sounds. the rest of the Oath can be - and IS - entirely valid and binding upon the people who swear it.

You've cited the law that specified the wording of the Oath, but you haven't cited any regulations that specifically define the military as a religious organization. You didn't because, I believe, you CAN'T. There are no such regs.

The militarty is not a religious organization. ergo, it is a secular organization.”

anolitek on Dec 6, 2012 at 11:59:12

“"So help me God" was not part of the original oath, nor is it a mandatory part of today's. Those individuals who do not believe in God are not required to include the phrase "So help me God" in their oath (they, and others, are also allowed to "affirm" as opposed to "swear" to their allegiance.)

For further enlightenment, I recommend you consider the article (obviously written by a believer) at

http://www.airpower.au.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj02/win02/keskel.html

For protecting my religious freedoms, I much prefer an Army of ethical atheists over one of hypocritical, proselytizing believers (of any religion).”
Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Why I Don't Want to Be a West Point Graduate

Commented Dec 5, 2012 at 23:36:27 in Politics

“I've been discriminated against as a Christian in the Army, and I am an Army officer. I'm a graduate of the "Benning School for Boys", otherwise known as Officer Candidate School. I want to personally thank you for resigning. I have been dismayed in my 16 years of service to see officers commit fraud, cheat on their wives, sexually harrass others, and commit other crimes if not just acts unbecoming officers. We don't need anymore of it. Secularism runs rampant in our ranks and erodes our leadership. We don't need anymore people with feelings of entitlement wearing our proud uniform. So again, thanks for quitting. You save us the trouble of having to deal with your inefficiency and lack of leadership as a commissioned officer. Kids, look at this guys example and DO NOT emulate it!”

JamaicanJewel on Dec 6, 2012 at 13:39:43

“Your diatribe proves the point of the article! Plus, you don't dare state that the bad behaviors of which you speak are committed by only the secularists: Judge not lest you be judged! People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones!”

Aaron on Dec 6, 2012 at 01:54:39

“Another phony Christian, obviously raised with prejudiced fundamentalist ideology, no different and no less dangerous than the Taliban in Afghanistan. People like this would turn America into a theocracy, where the only qualifications for holding any office of responsibility would be the ability to convince others that you believe what they believe.

The people who founded this nation fled just such an oppressive environment, and made it clear in no uncertain terms in our Constitution, that there would never be a religious test applied to anyone in America for anything.

No doubt this guy is one of those Pseudo-conservatives who wants to hand this country over to Plutocratic corporate control, because the owners of those corporations promise they will support his crusade to Christianize America.

I suppose we must forgive them, turn the other cheek, for they know not what they do.”

Greg Papadatos on Dec 6, 2012 at 00:36:41

“"Secularism runs rampant in our ranks and erodes our leadership."

Are you kidding us, Sir? Or are you serious? If it's the latter, then I sincerely and seriously hope that you never serve in my unit, or ever have any influence on the careers or lives of my men.

The U.S. Army is a secular organization. If you disagree with me, then I invite you to provide me - and the rest of us - with the military regulation that states otherwise.”