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Suzanne Stauffer Lambert's Comments

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Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 5, 2014 at 18:15:38 in Religion

“Oh, just one more thing -- Buddha is not a god.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 5, 2014 at 18:15:04 in Religion

“As long as you are going to insist that words do not have meaning, and that differences are unimportant and can be glossed over with "to all intents and purposes," then there is really no purpose to even reading what you write.”

BannedInBoston on May 5, 2014 at 21:48:35

“Then don't, since you're not reading what I say correctly anyway. For example, I cannot see anywhere where I "insist that words do not have meaning." Nor was I glossing over any differences. ALL religions are unique including Buddhism. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are relative more similar to each other than any of them is to Buddhism beause the all spring from the same source. Moreover, if popular Buddhism worships Buddha (as it does) then it is correct to say that, to all intents and purposes Buddha occupies the status of a divinity even though technically he is not. Learn to make distinctions like this and you will be less unhappy when reading (or not reading!) comments like mine....”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 4, 2014 at 23:02:08 in Religion

“Thank you -- I feel that I've learned more about the issue from your one paragraph. Today's Doonesbury is particularly apropos http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 4, 2014 at 18:43:50 in Religion

“What is the common definition of the term?

What are the names of these Buddhist scriptures? Who was the divinity from whom they were received? What creation myths and commandments do they contain?

If you would not call them dogma, then why do you even mention them?

If it's all semantics, why are you even posting?”

BannedInBoston on May 5, 2014 at 15:36:18

“Definitions like that of "religion" are semantics and it's important to get our definitions straight if nothing else. As to Buddhist scriptures, the basic texts are divided into two categories: Buddhavacana (the Word of the Buddha) and other texts. The former, to all intents and purposes, have the status of scripture in the West. The textual traditions in Buddhism are much more complex than they are in the so-called "Abrahamic religions" (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). But to all intents and purposes, many of the Buddhist texts have essentially the status of "scripture." For example, in Mahayana ("Greater Vehicle") Buddhism, the "sutras" are traditionally considered by Mahayanists to be the word of the Buddha, but transmitted either in secret, via lineages of supernatural beings (such as the nagas), or revealed directly from other Buddhas or bodhisattvas. There isn't a single book with a black cover and gold lettering in the title....”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 4, 2014 at 18:35:11 in Religion

“I was agreeing with you. This is not about a "fundamentalist Buddhism." It is about a militant nationalist Buddhism -- or perhaps militant nationalist Buddhists. It's not at all clear from this short and shallow story what their justification is for their behavior.”

patparco on May 4, 2014 at 20:57:23

“I am not really very familiar with the situation in Thailand (though I think it is exacerbated by agitation from extremist elements in Malaysia) but the article really fails to note the historical depth of the other two conflicts,They are not new by any means. The Sinhalese feel that they have been pushed south for centuries and the Burmese have been in periodic conflicts with the Rohingase who have been moving over the border since at least the days of the British Raj. And no doubt they are aware of the murder and displacement of Buddhist minorities on the other side of the border. So yeah, the article settles for easy buzz words instead of analysis.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 4, 2014 at 08:16:01 in Religion

“What is the common definition of the term?

It's that "more or less," "all intents and purposes" that is significant. There may be cults and splinter groups and popular versions (Pure Land comes to mind), but, to call it "fundamentalist Buddhism" is simply not correct. That means that this group is adhering to a literal interpretation of holy scripture, and, leaving aside the issue of whether there is holy scripture, it begs the question of what there is in Buddhist writings to be interpreted "literally." There are no creation myths and no commandments. Call it "a splinter group" or "a militant cult."”

BannedInBoston on May 4, 2014 at 16:23:39

“In my book, if someone CALLS himself or herself a "Buddhist" or "Christian" or whatever (and seriously believes this to be the case) then he or she IS a Buddhist or Christian, etc.. I don't go with the idea that somehow there are "true" Buddhists and "true" Christians, as this way of thinking has been responsible for many if not more of the religious wars and conflicts. Re holy scripture, there ARE "Buddhist scriptures," and there are "lineages" in Buddhism, especially Tibetan Buddhism, that adhere fairly stricltly to a particular set of ideas (I don't know if I'd call them "dogma"). It's all semantics anyway, but in the end, I would still maintain that Buddhism is a religion while making an exception for Western "intellectual" Buddhists who (understandably) would rather not look at it that way....”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 4, 2014 at 08:08:05 in Religion

“My statement was the arguably, Christianity is NOT a pacifist religion. Christianity does not prohibit war or capital punishment. Atrocities have been committed in the name of Christianity for centuries, by Christian churches, nations, and individuals.

I have read the record above. Your objection seems to be to the fact that I used your exact phrasing, structure and tone against you in my response.

I object to your pedantic, patronizing tone. You need to leave off being the "teacher" unless you are in the classroom. I am not your student.

The fact that someone has a different opinion from you does not mean that they are "ignoring" your own minority opinions on a topic. Your statements about Jesus are not in any way accepted historical thought on the topic. There is not even a consensus on whether such a person existed, let alone whether he said and did the things written in the Gospels, which may or may not have been written by the people whose names are attached to them.

All of which says nothing about whether Christianity is a pacifist religion. It is not. It does not prohibit war or capital punishment. It can even be interpreted to encourage it.”

ArepoSator on May 4, 2014 at 11:18:57

“Okay.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 16:15:58 in Religion

“I'm sorry your feelings are hurt. If you can't take it, you shouldn't dish it out. You are the one who attempted to instruct me in the "problems with that interpretation." If you want to be treated with respect, try treating others with respect. You might also want to avoid this level of sophomoric attempts at sarcasm. You're only making it clear that you cannot carry on an adult discussion of a topic as an equal.

No, you do not know what my field is. You know nothing about me, yet you assumed that I was in need of your instruction, simply because I dare to hold a different opinion than you on matters of religious faith.

I mean any non-religious, critical history sources. Any source other than those that begin with the premise that there was an actual, historical Jesus; that he was, in fact, the son of god; that the words and actions attributed to him were authentically recorded and that they were recorded by the men whose names are attached to those records.”

ArepoSator on May 3, 2014 at 17:20:21

“"yet you assumed that I was in need of your instruction, simply because I dare to hold a different opinion than you on matters of religious faith." I'm sorry you took it that way. I was merely commenting that I didn't agree with your statement that Christianity is a pacifist religion. You even said "arguably," so I argued in the hopes that we could have a civil discussion about it. Instead, YOU'RE the one who came back all snarky, accusing me of "showing off," and being rather rude. I didn't start it, sweety; you set the tone. If you need proof, read the record above. Now, I will apologize for offending you and I would even welcome civil discourse, but you seem a bit ready for battle rather than a discussion. One of the things I teach (and yes, I'm willing to share my field with you, not because I'm "showing off," but because I assume you'd like to know if I have any credibility in this area) is argument. The word comes from the Latin for silver, like a mirror. Argument is not fighting. I hold up a mirror to you, and in response you hold one up to me. It's dialogic and it can go on forever. You however, seem more interested in smashing the mirror over my head, and that's just bad luck. ;-)”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 16:05:40 in Religion

“An ad hominem attack. That means I win, as you clearly have no intelligent, rational refutation.”

Dr Ian Moone on May 3, 2014 at 17:51:39

“"Win?" Winning entails a contest.

The OP said "that is not Buddhism." But, the truth is that the atrocities in question were committed by Buddhists who were acting in the name of their spiritual convictions. Mind you: these are people who were probably raised from the cradle as Buddhists. But, because their expressions don't match the expectation of some westerner who probably discovered Buddhism in college, well it just *can't* be Buddhism.

*yawn*

I wasn't arguing with you (or OP). Saying "that isn't Buddhism" is an example of the "no true Scotsman" logical fallacy. You can agree with the OP's premise or not, but that doesn't change the fact of the logical fallacy. The reason I suggested that the point I made went over your head is because you followed up the original comment with a reiteration of the exact same logical fallacy as if by repeating it, you might make it more legitimate. Unfortunately, reason and discourse doesn't work like that.

Ad hominem is also a logical fallacy, by the way. However, pointing out that you missed the point when you make the exact same mistake as the OP isn't attacking your person to delegitimize you; it's just pointing out that you don't know what you are talking about. That might *feel* like an attack on you, but that is just because truth is blinding and searing to the ignorant.

https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/no-true-scotsman
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 14:04:30 in Religion

“Yes, you were mistaken (and yes, I know you think you're being sarcastic) about all of that. You were also mistaken in thinking that you know everything there is to know on this topic. Your actual knowledge of the history of Christianity is not nearly as complete as you like to think and obviously comes from a handful of fundamentalist sources.”

ArepoSator on May 3, 2014 at 14:13:54

“"Yes, you were mistaken." Clearly. "You were also mistaken in thinking that you know everything there is to know on this topic." No straw person there! ;-) "Your actual knowledge of the history of Christianity is not nearly as complete as you like to think and obviously comes from a handful of fundamentalist sources." That's true if by "fundamental sources" you mean teaching a translations course where we look at the original Koine Greek of the Gospels, or being part of an interfaith discussion group comprised of professors at the same state university I teach at: a Catholic deacon who teaches the Bible as literature, a rabbi, an Buddhist scholar, and an Imam from the local mosque. So, yeah, I'm thinking you're correct once again. I don't know what your field is in, but I'm going to guess it's a lot more impressive than I can imagine. So I hang my head in shame, shake the dust off of my feet, and skulk away into my ignorant self with my tail between my loins. Shalom. ;-)”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 12:45:34 in Religion

“The problem with your interpretation is that it completely ignores the fact that I said "Christianity," not "Jesus." I appreciate that you want to show off your particular view of Judaism (i.e., "Jews for Jesus") and the historical Jesus (who was never in any historical document refered to as "Rabbi Yeshua ben Yoseph"), but that is irrelevant to my post. Your argument also assumes that there was a historical Jesus and that the writers of the New Testament faithfully recorded his words and deeds. Again, irrelevant to my post. And, finally, you mistakenly assume that I am Christian and have no knowledge of Judaism.

I repeat, arguably, Christianity is not pacifist. Let's not forget the Inquisition and the Crusades, to say nothing of all the wars and atrocities that have been committed by those who are convinced that "God is on our side." Those two quotations, along with many others from the Bible (not the Torah -- we are talking about Christianity, not Judaism), have been used to justify all of these -- regardless of whether you agree with that interpretation of them. And this is historical fact.”

ArepoSator on May 3, 2014 at 13:15:56

“My mistake. I thought Jesus was actually Jewish. I also mistakenly thought that Christianity came from Judaism (you know, like Buddhism came out of Hinduism?) I also foolishly assumed that the Crusades and the Inquisition resulted from twisting the words of a pacifist Jewish teacher who said, "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you." Here I thought that when you were discussing "Christianity," not "Jesus," that Jesus was the founder of "Christianity." What does an old Jew like me know about that? ;-) Here I assumed that when "Christianity" does not follow the teachings of Rabbi Yeshua, it is no longer Christianity, any more than violence done in the name of Buddhism no longer resembles or follows the teachings of Buddha. I also apologize for my "showing off." And here I thought I could share some of what I know (which is clearly all incorrect and impossible to back up historically when we look at the Palestine in which Rabbi Yeshua ben Yoseph.. oh, sorry, Jesus .. grew up in). Again, my apologies and I defer to your clearly superior knowledge on the topic. Please forgive me. Shalom.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:56:27 in Religion

“Apparently we cannot edit our posts. In any case, Buddhists are not Buddhism. There have always been examples of militant nationalism among Buddhists -- not among Buddhism, which is a system of belief, not a group of people. Buddhism does not teach nationalism, let alone militant nationalism. Buddhists, who are human beings, think, do, and teach many things that are not found in Buddhism.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:53:49 in Religion

“The term "fundamentalism" is inaccurate and incorrect. "Fundamentalism" is defined as an adherence to a strict, literal interpretation of scripture and/or orthodox theology and dogma. There is no scripture in Buddhism, no theology and no dogma, and there certainly is nothing in any of the writings that even suggests this kind of militant nationalism.”

Netta5187 on May 4, 2014 at 02:23:18

“Thank you! Finally someone intelligent enough to do research on the topic at hand instead of make off-hand, pseudo-intellectual remarks on it. I automatically take points away from a statement that labels Buddhism a religion instead of philosophy. When you're a Buddhist, you are permitted to studying, practicing and combining various faiths alongside Buddhism. But there is no God or worship, no scripture etc etc.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:41:49 in Religion

“Arguably, Christianity is not pacifist. Let's not forget the Inquisition and the Crusades, to say nothing of all the wars and atrocities that have been committed by those who are convinced that "God is on our side." Just read the words of the Battle Hymn of the Republic or the final stanza of the Star Spangled Banner.

"Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man's foes shall be they of his own household" -- Matthew 10:34-36

"I am come to send fire on the earth; and what will I, if it be already kindled? But I have a baptism to be baptized with; and how am I straitened till it be accomplished! Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division: For from henceforth there shall be five in one house divided, three against two, and two against three. The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against the father; the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother; the mother in law against her daughter in law, and the daughter in law against her mother in law" -- Luke 12:49-53.”

ArepoSator on May 3, 2014 at 12:14:53

“Well, the problem with that interpretation is that it completely ignores that fact that Jesus (or Rabbi Yeshua ben Yoseph) was an aggadic (homelitic or parabolic), not halakhic rabbi. I think a lot of Christians make the mistake of forgetting that he was a Jew and taught within the rabbinical traditions. So, your first from Matthew 10 is clearly meant to be read metaphorically (as much of his teaching is); otherwise he is suggesting that he has come to urge people to commit parricide. The quote from Luke is the same. The "sword" is a metaphor for argument. This is in keeping with the rabbinical tradition of reinterpretation and VERBAL conflict. Look up Bet Shammai and Bet Hillel. Anyway, one of the most wonderful things about Jesus is that he turned the Torah "upside down" (as we say in midrash) precisely to preach a message of love: "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you," "turn the other cheek," etc., which all transform the original Lex Talionis into a message of love and compassion. That's why people like Tolstoy, Gandhi, and MLK admired him. That's why I admire him. :-) Shalom.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:32:27 in Religion

“Buddhism is not a religion.”

Fisher4 on May 6, 2014 at 22:42:14

“The statement that Buddhism is not a religion is a ‘belief’ that is contrary to the elements that indeed ascribe it to be a ‘religion’. Buddhism has “narratives, symbols, and sacred histories” and provides a set of “beliefs about” the cosmos and human nature, which tend to derive morality, ethics, religious laws or dictates a preferred lifestyle. The practice of a religion includes rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration of a deity, gods or goddesses, sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trance, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service or other aspects of human culture.”

Suzanne Stauffer Lambert on May 3, 2014 at 08:56:27

“Apparently we cannot edit our posts. In any case, Buddhists are not Buddhism. There have always been examples of militant nationalism among Buddhists -- not among Buddhism, which is a system of belief, not a group of people. Buddhism does not teach nationalism, let alone militant nationalism. Buddhists, who are human beings, think, do, and teach many things that are not found in Buddhism.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:31:34 in Religion

“It's not a religion. It's a philosophy or system of belief. If this demonstrates anything, it demonstrates that human beings have the capacity for violence and may exercise it, regardless of their culture's teachings.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:29:59 in Religion

“Precisely. Which means it is the antithesis of Buddhism, which teaches letting go of all such identities.”

patparco on May 4, 2014 at 17:26:31

“Be that as it may, Buddhism exists because it was transmitted through and as a part of particular institutions, traditions and cultures. Without that it would not exist as a living tradition but would only be found in dry and dusty tomes on the history of ideas.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:29:26 in Religion

“It's not a religion. It's a system of belief. It does not posit any supernatural power -- that is, there is no god in Buddhism.”

BannedInBoston on May 3, 2014 at 17:07:48

“Buddhism is a religion by the common definition of that term. And, in fact, popular Buddhism in Asia does have its pantheon of what are, more or less, deities, including the Buddha himself, who is, to all intents and purposes, "worshipped" in many places. I would agree that what I would call "intellectual Buddhism," which is the version mostly practiced in this country, is probably not thought of as a "religion" by its adherents who, in fact, mostly tend to be the well-educated and intellectuals....”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:28:13 in Religion

“No, actually, it doesn't. It teaches that the only way to avoid suffering is to let go of those beliefs and to accept that the universe and everything in it is impermanent.”
Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Asian Buddhism's Growing Fundamentalist Streak Signals Growth Of Religious Nationalism In Several Countries

Commented May 3, 2014 at 08:26:16 in Religion

“There is faulty reasoning, but it is on your part. First, the statement was "That is not Buddhism." Not "That is not Buddhists." Buddhism is a system of belief and as such, it is perfectly reasonable and legitimate to state that a given doctrine is or is not part of that system of belief. Buddhists are those who adhere to that system of belief -- to a greater or lesser degree. The original poster made no statement about Buddhists.

And your analogy is faulty, as well, based on your initial conflation of Buddhism with Buddhists. Again, Buddhism is a system of belief. "Scotsman" is a nationality. The two are not analogous.”

Dr Ian Moone on May 3, 2014 at 14:09:05

“----------->the point

----------->the top of your head”
Richer White People In Greater Baton Rouge Seek To Secede From Poorer Black Neighbors

Richer White People In Greater Baton Rouge Seek To Secede From Poorer Black Neighbors

Commented Dec 4, 2013 at 17:18:07 in Politics

“Please correct the error in the first paragraph. They have not collected half of the signatures necessary to form a city. They have collected half of the signatures necessary to call an election. That is, about 12.5% of the residents have signed the petition.

They still have to get another 12.5% to sign the petition and then they will then have to garner 51% of the vote. I live in the area in question, and right now, it's 48% in favor, 47% against.”

Softnsweet on Dec 4, 2013 at 17:33:52

“You people are really something.”
9 Female Book Characters Punished For Having Sex

9 Female Book Characters Punished For Having Sex

Commented Oct 11, 2013 at 08:11:34 in Books

“Only nine? You need to read more widely. Off the top of my head, Hetty Sorrel in "Adam Bede," Mary Thorne's mother in "Dr. Thorne," Nancy in "Oliver Twist" -- pick any Victorian author.

And yes, Alec and Tess were related; it's hard to believe that anyone could have read the book and missed that, as it's both a major plot point and integral to the theme of the book.

I would argue, however, that "The Scarlet Letter" is a much more complex novel than you suggest.”
Joey Prusak, Dairy Queen Manager In Minnesota, Gets National Attention For Awesome Good Deed

Joey Prusak, Dairy Queen Manager In Minnesota, Gets National Attention For Awesome Good Deed

Commented Sep 21, 2013 at 19:44:22 in Good News

“A full scholarship yes -- but not to business school. They teach the ethics and compassion right out of him.”
huffingtonpost entry

Teacher Allegedly Fired For Using The Word 'Negro' In Her Spanish Class, Sues

Commented May 24, 2013 at 21:58:11 in Black Voices

“No, not because I say so. Because that is the way that it was. You don't have to take my word for it. You could do some research of your own, read a book or two about the history of those times, learn something new.”

ginadeoliveira2008 on May 24, 2013 at 22:14:10

“I was right there in person! Why would I research the times? My take on it is not yours. But if you say so...”
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