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hp blogger Daniel Cubias's Comments

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huffingtonpost entry

Are White People Disenfranchised?

Commented May 15, 2011 at 21:46:13 in Politics

“"What is white?" (or "Who is white?") is an excellent question. Perhaps another post is in order to address that one.”
huffingtonpost entry

Are White People Disenfranchised?

Commented May 15, 2011 at 02:15:01 in Politics

“When referring to "founding stock Americans," I presume that you are including the black slaves whose forced labor made it possible for European colonists to prosper.”

RafaleMirage on May 19, 2011 at 20:55:16

“No: I'm referring to the Anglo-Protestants who colonized the land and created the nation. While one is not unmindful of the contributions of Africans, Plymouth Colony, for example, prospered without any significant use of slaves.”

Slater Torret on May 15, 2011 at 03:50:59

“I'm not sure if that links is going to work, but you can search "Alternet, America's Largest Newspaper Launches a Nasty Attack on Grandma and Grandpa."”

Slater Torret on May 15, 2011 at 03:49:05

“Nice article, Daniel.

I'm white and I think those folks are a wee bit hysterical. Economically, everyone is suffering, except the wealthiest 25% (appx), and what this majority group are doing is classic scapegoating, IMO. Textbook fearmongering from the conservative establishment permeates our media. And now, they're going after (drumroll please) SENIORS! Those selfish old people who are stealing from your children's college fund!

http://www.alternet.org/economy/150930/america%27s_largest_newspaper_launches_a_nasty_attack_on_grandma_and_grandpa/?page=3”
huffingtonpost entry

Are White People Disenfranchised?

Commented May 15, 2011 at 02:10:14 in Politics

“I see how someone could get that impression about Tim Wise from the article. This is a mistake on my part, and I thank you for the correction.”
huffingtonpost entry

Has Anti-Latino Sentiment Peaked?

Commented Mar 19, 2011 at 16:15:07 in Politics

“Of course, it is not inherently racist to object to illegal immigration. But to deny that there is a racial element to the debate defies reality.”

JustinP213 on Mar 20, 2011 at 18:59:30

“Well, Cubias, Hispanic isn't considered a race. As for ethnicity, of course there is an ethnicity element. This is so since 75 percent of illegals are of Hispanic origin. If 75 percent were Canadian, then there'd be more emphasis on those illegals.”

tnkeating on Mar 20, 2011 at 17:00:55

“To deny racial elements exist in any ethnicity, race or any political group be it democrat, republican, independent or libertarian defies reality.”

sibyl9 on Mar 19, 2011 at 17:45:32

“But surely, you are the one injecting the racial element here with your article conflating the anti-illegal immigration sentiment with anti-Latino sentiment.”
huffingtonpost entry

For CareerBuilder Chimps, Sadly, the Joke Is On Them

Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 10:54:01 in Media

“One would think that the corporations who make boatloads of money off these animals could fork over some cash to care for them later. Perhaps that should be a condition of using animals in advertising or films?”
Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Commented Jan 24, 2011 at 11:14:03 in Politics

“My point exactly: the word "amnesty" is a powerful marketing tool. It's not accurate, but it's effective for shutting down debate over immigration reform. It's less important that it may not actually be true.”

rubbercow on Jan 24, 2011 at 11:42:44

“You make some good points with this article, Mr. Cubias. Both sides have a lot to learn about having an honest discussion about the issue of illegal immigration. Words like "undocumented", referring to illegal immigrants as simply "immigrants" and so on do just as much to derail any reasonable discussion as any of the words used by the far right. Further, the tactic of shouting down anyone who sees illegal immigration as a problem by calling them a "racist" or "xenophobe" is equally damaging to the argument for reform.”

intolleft on Jan 24, 2011 at 11:30:14

“The term is dead on accurate, regardless of what is said.”
Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Commented Jan 23, 2011 at 15:42:05 in Politics

“"If the child does not like it, tell them to ask Mom and/or Dad why they entered the USA illegally."

Mom and/or Dad will probably say "So you wouldn't grow up in abject poverty."

In any case, our policy is very much of the "sins of the father" variety.”

Cory111 on Jan 23, 2011 at 17:01:10

“Most Mexicans the come to the States for work are no interested in living there, it’s much too expensive. They work then send their wages back to Mexico and for the most part they never pay taxes.
True enough most illegal’s are uneducated, those that work with their hands. But don’t spread your “Abject Poverty” through out Mexico. Mexico is a very industrious country, it’s not what you see or hear at the borders.
To truly know Mexico is to live in Mexico, not just vacation here.”
Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Commented Jan 23, 2011 at 15:38:28 in Politics

“Yes, you're right. Although it's imperative to call out racism where it exists, I have never seen anyone's mind changed by lobbing the word "racist" at them.”
Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Does Immigration Reform Have a Marketing Problem?

Commented Jan 23, 2011 at 15:34:51 in Politics

“"Groups like MoveOn.org and progressive media personalities like Rachel Maddow treated the DREAM Act as a mere afterthought."

That's a good point. Perhaps there is another post there on why immigration-reform advocates have been unable to build coalitions.”
huffingtonpost entry

A Field Guide to Bad Behavior at Political Protests

Commented Aug 26, 2010 at 12:04:14 in Politics

“I didn't claim that the Second Amendment protesters were violent. I said they were attempting to intimidate people. And regardless of what you think of people's rights to carry weapons, I think we can all agree that a guy with an assault rifle is intimidating, even if there is no overt violence on display.”

molonlabe on Aug 26, 2010 at 14:08:05

“"I think we can all agree that a guy with an assault rifle is intimidating.."

I have to disagree with you. Intimidation, absent an overt action to threaten like racking the slide and pointing it at someone, or unholstering a handgun and waiving it around in a threatening manner, is mostly a subjective inference based on preconceived notions or beliefs. Firearms have been demonized for decades, mostly by the left and anti-gun organizations. Pertinent to today's political climate, firearms and those who own/carry them are generalized as a "fringe" ideal held only by right wing extremists or insurrectionists/militants.

Now, am I saying that those who are uncomfortable around firearms because of lack of knowledge or exposure to them are completely irrational? No. What i'm saying is that you can't assume that the mere presence of a firearm constitutes an overt threat. The carrying of firearms at recent protests are symbolic in nature and not an intentional action to threaten those in opposition.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Unintended Consequences of Arizona's SB 1070

Commented Jun 24, 2010 at 19:33:15 in Politics

“The estimate of 12-20 million illegal immigrants is generally accepted as accurate, and I can only assume that 45 million is hyperbole. Furthermore, the rate of crossings is going down (potential illegals are scared off by our poor economy and stricter border enforcement).

As for their offspring, if born in America, they would of course be U.S. citizens and not illegal at all.

And the argument “What Would Mexico Do?” is only trotted out to make us feel better about our broken system. Mexico also has universal healthcare, and we seem just as likely to adopt that as we do their immigration system (but of course, that’s another story).”
huffingtonpost entry

The Unintended Consequences of Arizona's SB 1070

Commented Jun 24, 2010 at 16:30:28 in Politics

“As I'm sure you know, plenty of Cuban-Americans came here in the Mariel boatlift:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariel_boatlift

These Hispanics and their offspring remain a Republican base. So we have indeed had a mass immigration of a conservative-leaning group.”

AZ native on Jun 25, 2010 at 14:27:17

“I don't think Cuban Americans are exactly sweating the new Arizona law, in fact our state polls show that 30% of Hispanics support the law, another 30% would support it as well if they would just take the time to "read the law", the law specifically prohibits racial profiling, and to make themselves aware of the true facts of the burdens to taxpayers, they are being swayed by all the lies being touted by "open border activists". The other 40% will never support any anti-illegal initiative because they have too much to lose such as all the free education, healthcare and social services that Americans taxpayers provide, not to mention employment opportunities and possible legalization. I can assure you that many Cuban Americans understand this.”

MuddleVanHeck on Jun 24, 2010 at 20:58:47

“Well Mr. Cubias, I suppose we should end our little banter. I'd like to say that I appreciate your civility, and I'd like to assume you're coming from a place of compassion.

That said, I remind you that 'fairness,' over and above all ethnic and philosophic beliefs, is the true universal language, and we shouldn't be so quick to dismiss the 'what if' factor. That is the only common footing for debate.

I referred to the Mexican population's offspring because you used the same point in your response about the Cuban refugees. I also refuse to ignore "What would Mexico do?" when comparing the colonization of the U.S. to the same thing--should we colonize Mexico? Unfortunately, you can't pick and choose your facts to fit your philosophy...no matter how noble you believe your cause.

Everything I've garnered from this conversation seems to indicate that the U.S. and her people should bow down to this takeover, but did you really expect that would happen? The polls tell you exactly where the citizens stand, and you have no right to demand otherwise. Nor would we expect the good people of Mexico to tolerate the same.

I strongly urge you to recognize that we're all being played...by the media and multinational corporate greed. Remember:

Those who stand for nothing (fair) fall for anything.

-- Alexander Hamilton”

hp blogger Daniel Cubias on Jun 24, 2010 at 19:33:15

“The estimate of 12-20 million illegal immigrants is generally accepted as accurate, and I can only assume that 45 million is hyperbole. Furthermore, the rate of crossings is going down (potential illegals are scared off by our poor economy and stricter border enforcement).

As for their offspring, if born in America, they would of course be U.S. citizens and not illegal at all.

And the argument “What Would Mexico Do?” is only trotted out to make us feel better about our broken system. Mexico also has universal healthcare, and we seem just as likely to adopt that as we do their immigration system (but of course, that’s another story).”

MuddleVanHeck on Jun 24, 2010 at 18:01:42

“Mr. Cubias! Surely you jest!

"By that point, as many as 125,000 Cubans had made the journey to Florida."

The estimates of 12-20 million illegal immigrants are from the last century. The likely number today is between 30 and 45 million (AND their offspring). There's a huge difference in the demographics.

Since you obviously have no problem with the 'bare-knuckled capitalism' stance, let me ask you this instead. If U.S. citizens began a mass migration into Mexico, would we be afforded the same privileges there, i.e. free medical, food stamps, low-income housing, etc.? Would the Mexican authorities ignore our illegal status? Would we successfully implement Spanish language programs in their schools? Would we have "for English, press 2" accommodations throughout Mexico? Would we have the ability to teach our kids (in their schools) that we were superior, and that the Mexican government should be overthrown?

These are rhetorical questions, by the way. I already know the answers.

Be careful what you wish for...we do need a dumping ground for nuclear waste, etc., and we're hungry for natural resources and income.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Unintended Consequences of Arizona's SB 1070

Commented Jun 24, 2010 at 14:12:01 in Politics

“This is a report from the Cato Institute (hardly a leftist organization), which states that "even low-skilled immigrants expand the economic pie and create jobs farther up the ladder":
http://www.newsweek.com/2009/08/14/immigrants-make-more-jobs-than-they-take.html

MuddleVanHeck on Jun 24, 2010 at 16:06:49

“Mr. Cubias,

Cato is hardly a reflection of mainstream America. If you support an organization that is a corporate-sponsored mouthpiece for bare-knuckled capitalism, then I suppose Cato is for you. Of COURSE they support illegal immigration! The biggest benefactor would be big tobacco, Walmart, Inc., big ag, the meatpacking industries, and virtually every other entity that profits from slave-labor wages w/ no benefits.

This from Wikepedia:

Cato received support from 20 corporations in 2007[68] including:

* Altria Group (Formerly Philip Morris)
* American Petroleum Institute
* Comcast Corporations
* FedEx Corporation
* Microsoft
* R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
* Visa Inc.
* Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
* A number of foreign and domestic car companies

Cato received support from 20 corporations in 2007[68] including:

* Altria Group (Formerly Philip Morris)
* American Petroleum Institute
* Comcast Corporations
* FedEx Corporation
* Microsoft
* R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
* Visa Inc.
* Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
* A number of foreign and domestic car companies”
huffingtonpost entry

Death at the Border: Bringing out the Worst in the Immigration Debate

Commented Jun 14, 2010 at 12:26:24 in Politics

“Current immigration law is often inhumane. While it is not unreasonable to ask that laws be enforced, my point is that many Americans are filled with such hatred for the undocumented that it's not about the law for them. It's about stomping on undesirables. And that makes immigration reform more difficult.”
huffingtonpost entry

Death at the Border: Bringing out the Worst in the Immigration Debate

Commented Jun 14, 2010 at 12:19:23 in Politics

“It's possible that the shooting was accidental, but that appears unlikely. I find it hard to believe that a conclusion other than justified self-defense or murder will be the final comment on this case.”

grossmont328 on Jun 23, 2010 at 19:43:57

“Sorry to tell you--there is no excuse for the Border Patrol agent to be pelted with rocks for doing his job”
huffingtonpost entry

Death at the Border: Bringing out the Worst in the Immigration Debate

Commented Jun 13, 2010 at 19:09:17 in Politics

“Unfortunately, I didn't copy the link (my mistake). It was on the CNN site. The author, as in most cases like this, preferred to remain anonymous.”

citizen1787 on Jun 13, 2010 at 19:16:32

“I don't doubt that a person could make a comment like that online. It's just nice to know who made it. If they post regularly you can see if they are just another crack-pot, a smart-ass teenager or something else.

Why did you post the CNN clip? It is heavily edited, there is an unedited clip from the Washington Post. Just curious and thank you for your reply to my question.”
huffingtonpost entry

Death at the Border: Bringing out the Worst in the Immigration Debate

Commented Jun 13, 2010 at 18:08:04 in Politics

“I don't believe I said anything about open borders or amnesty. In fact, some of my ideas about illegal immigration might surprise you (that's called a teaser; stay tuned!).”

goldheart on Jun 14, 2010 at 07:59:56

“"illegal immigration"...seem like you combining two separte things...illegals are not immigrants. I have no problem with immigrants, but do have a problem with illegal aliens!

There 's legal immigration or illegal invasion!”

wigglwagon on Jun 14, 2010 at 02:07:21

“That being the case, could you explain what you meant when you said, "I've written that the first step in immigration reform is to see the undocumented as humans, rather than as some virus that needs to be eradicated"?

I am having trouble understanding this statement since I do not see how asking that the laws be enforced equates to viewing illegal immigrants as "some virus that needs to be eradicated". Is there something inhuman about immigration law?”
The Problematic Effort to Get Rid of Anchor Babies

The Problematic Effort to Get Rid of Anchor Babies

Commented Jun 4, 2010 at 19:55:23 in Politics

“So the Amendment’s reference to “jurisdiction” renders the whole point about being born in the US irrelevant? If it’s true that illegal immigrants and their kids are not subject to our jurisdiction, I guess this means they can commit whatever crimes they want while they’re here. They’re not subject to our jurisdiction so we can’t prosecute them (damn, don’t tell the undocumented).

I am also heartened that conservatives have seized upon one redundant phrase in the 14th amendment in an attempt to undermine it. There is no contradiction between that and how fervently they argued that the whole “well regulated militia” phrase in the 2nd Amendment was completely irrelevant.

In any case, the fact remains that it would take an incredibly activist judge (one of the supposed bad guys) to overturn the many precedents that have upheld this interpretation of the Constitution.

Love seeing Latin phrases on HuffPo, though.”

ToddO in Texas on Jun 5, 2010 at 00:55:39

“"So the Amendment’s reference to “jurisdiction” renders the whole point about being born in the US irrelevant?" No you must be born here AND under the jurisdiction of the US. The phrase just makes the definition of US birthright citizenship more narrow.

The phrase is not redundant. It is a well-established doctrine of legal interpretation that legal texts, including the Constitution, are not to be interpreted to create redundancy unless any other interpretation would lead to absurd results. See, e.g., Gustafson v. Alloyd Co., Inc., 513 U.S. 561, 562 (1995) ("this Court will avoid a reading which renders some words altogether redundant"); see also Richard A. Posner, Legal Formalism, Legal Realism, and the Interpretation of Statutes and the Constitution, 37 Case. W. Res. L. Rev. 179 (1989), And yes there is no contradiction between the interpretations of the 2nd and the 14th, as the phrases themselves are different.

Unfortunately you make a valid point about the chances of correction originating from the federal bench or SCOTUS. Even though of course they contradicted themselves on this very issue from the Slaughterhouse Cases.

Have you forgiven Rand Paul yet?”

Romulus on Jun 4, 2010 at 20:29:12

huffingtonpost entry

Are Reports of the Illegal-Immigration Crime Wave Even True?

Commented May 31, 2010 at 12:51:45 in Politics

“Yes, at the risk of quoting myself, I make clear that "there are plenty of legitimate concerns about illegal immigration." But exaggerating claims of violence is, at best, dishonest. At worst, it may lead to laws that backfire.”
huffingtonpost entry

How Did Arizona Drive Us into This Surreal Tizzy?

Commented May 2, 2010 at 13:33:12 in Politics

“Despite the last-minute change to the law, it’s naïve to think that Latinos will not be harassed. But I am happy for J. Gutierrez.”
huffingtonpost entry

Cochabamba PWCCC - Latinos and the Environment

Commented Apr 15, 2010 at 17:15:21 in Home

“Thanks for writing about something that is not typically thought of as "a Latino issue." The environment, and the stewardship of it, is one of the universal human issues that faces us all.”

hp blogger Kety Esquivel on Apr 16, 2010 at 12:35:41

“You are very welcome Daniel! I agree with you wholeheartedly though not something that is typically thought of as a "Latino issue" the environment and the stewardship of it is a universal human issue that affects us all. I am excited to see our community play a leadership role on this front. I will be writing more from Cochabamaba, Bolivia in the coming days. In appreciation, Kety”
huffingtonpost entry

Stand Up and Be Counted... Or Not: Why Latinos Have Issues With the Census

Commented Apr 7, 2010 at 20:55:58 in Politics

“The term "first-generation" is usually employed to refer to the children of immigrants who are born in the United States. As such, they are citizens and can't possibly be here illegally.”
huffingtonpost entry

Stand Up and Be Counted... Or Not: Why Latinos Have Issues With the Census

Commented Apr 7, 2010 at 20:53:46 in Politics

“It's very debatable what the "biological races" are, or even if such creatures actually exist. Many scientists believe that race has no objective criteria and is more of a social construct. If so, picking a race on a form is a subjective and personal act, not a dry analysis.”

cynara on Apr 20, 2010 at 13:55:43

“True, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to recognize one's indigenous heritage on the census form, just like Japanese, Chinese, East Asian Indian can acknowledge theirs? Its actually part of the census supplemental explanation forms that black means of African Descent and White signifies European descent. Where's the box for indigenous american descent?”
huffingtonpost entry

2012 Supplies One More Victory for Pseudoscience

Commented Nov 18, 2009 at 15:47:39 in Entertainment

“Now that's creative capitalism. And a business plan was born.”
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