THE BLOG

Why the IMF is Playing Hardball with Greece

06/15/2015 01:58 pm ET | Updated Jun 15, 2016

Under normal conditions, the IMF is supposed to be limited to lending up to 200 percent of a country's quota (each country's capital contribution made to the IMF) in a single year and 600 percent in cumulative total. However, under the IMF's "exceptional access" policy there are, in principle, virtually no limits on lending. The exceptional access policy, which was introduced in 2003, opened the door for Greece to talk its way into IMF credits worth an astounding 1,860 percent of Greece's quota -- a number worthy of an entry in the Guinness Book of World Records.

The IMF's over-the-top largesse towards Greece explains why the IMF has been forced to play hardball with Greece's left-wing Syriza government. The IMF's imprudent over-commitment of funds to Greece leaves it no choice but to pull the plug on Athens. That is why the IMF's negotiators packed their bags last week and returned to Washington, and that is why it will probably remain uncharacteristically immovable.