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Janice Rogers Brown

The Vote That Will Change America

Doug Kendall | Posted 01.25.2014 | Politics
Doug Kendall

Our federal government was designed as a republic. Within this system, and over time, elections were to have consequences and enlightened public opinion was to govern. Extra-constitutional appendages like the filibuster, abused by minority parties, have moved us away from that vision. Instead, our government is in perpetual gridlock, and the American people have lost faith in their government to even function properly. Even after this rules change, one of our parties must still win the House, the Senate, and the presidency before radically changing our country. That's no small feat. It will often require victories over the course of several elections. That's probably as it should be. Change ought to be possible, but only when one of our parties really earns it. The filibuster gave a small minority in the Senate outsized power to stifle the will of the people.

Harry Reid Can Move Obama's Nominees Without Changing the Filibuster

Paul Abrams | Posted 01.23.2014 | Politics
Paul Abrams

It would be best to change or eliminate the filibuster. Failing that, there is a way to get floor votes for the president's nominees.

A 'Pack' of Nonsense

Doug Kendall | Posted 08.07.2013 | Politics
Doug Kendall

The claim from the right is that President Obama is attempting to use these appointments to advance his policy agenda. This gets it exactly backwards. It is conservatives who have, successfully, used appointments to the D.C. Circuit to advance their policy agenda in recent years.

What a Conservative Judicial Revolution Looks Like

Doug Kendall | Posted 06.17.2012 | Politics
Doug Kendall

As the Supreme Court's conservative majority stands poised at the edge of a cliff -- debating whether or not to strike down the Affordable Care Act and pick a very large fight with Congress and a sitting President -- two conservative judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit sought to push them over the edge last week. Their opinion -- a startling call for the abandonment of eight decades of Supreme Court case law in economic cases and a return to the pre-New Deal "Lochner Era" -- is the clearest roadmap yet as to what a conservative judicial revolution looks like.

Constitution Check: Do Lower Court Judges Have a Right to Criticize the Supreme Court?

Lyle Denniston | Posted 06.17.2012 | Politics
Lyle Denniston

Is the judicial now becoming, more often, the political? Polls show that the public now believes that this is so.