iOS app Android app

Langston Hughes

No More Silent Statistics: Walter Finnie

Diane Luby Lane | Posted 08.20.2014 | Black Voices
Diane Luby Lane

Walter, our tall, dark, and handsome, Get Lit Player teen poet from Watts, is leaving for college in Pennsylvania in a few weeks, and I wanted to make sure that he had a coat.

God's Most Gifted...

Craig Stewart | Posted 07.24.2014 | Gay Voices
Craig Stewart

...

America Was Built on Hope Not Fear

Byron Williams | Posted 09.09.2014 | Politics
Byron Williams

For all of its virtues and vices, America has always stood as a beacon of hope. Movements such as civil rights, women's suffrage, and gay equality could not have occurred if America did not promote hope and possibility.

Dr. Vincent Harding’s Call to Make America America

Marian Wright Edelman | Posted 07.30.2014 | Politics
Marian Wright Edelman

We are citizens of a country that does not yet exist, but it is up to us to finally create and make it a just and hopeful land for all.

Why Poetry Matters

Pam Allyn | Posted 06.21.2014 | Books
Pam Allyn

Poetry is how we say to the world, and to each other, "I am here." Some of my most beloved poets -- Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, Billy Collins and Naomi Shihab Nye -- talk about poetry as a way to document the world and our common experiences, to say what needs to be said in a direct, powerful and beautiful way.

First Nighter: Moss Hart's "Act One" in Two Great, Big Acts

David Finkle | Posted 06.17.2014 | Arts
David Finkle

When theater veteran Moss Hart published his bestselling Act One in 1959, he packed a lot into it about his impoverished childhood and neophyte playwr...

First Nighter: Franco, O'Dowd, Meester Distinguish Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men'

David Finkle | Posted 06.16.2014 | Arts
David Finkle

Plucking the dialogue pretty much verbatim from his best-selling book, Steinbeck handily transferred his tale to the stage. Again George and Lennie -- traveling together like the scores of other bindlestiffs scouring California's Salinas Valley (Steinbeck's version of William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County) for work -- arrive at a farm for barley bucking activity.

First Nighter: Denzel Washington Good, Not So Good in "A Raisin in the Sun"

David Finkle | Posted 06.03.2014 | Arts
David Finkle

With Washington's return to The Great White Way in the revival of Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 A Raisin in the Sun at the Barrymore, he does a tremendous favor. Once again, as he did with his limited-runs Julius Caesar and Fences, he brings large audiences--especially African-American audiences--to a theater and to theater in the larger sense.

These Images Show The History Behind Places We Walk By Every Day

The Huffington Post | Danielle Cadet | Posted 02.19.2014 | Black Voices

Every day, we walk in the very places where history was made years ago. Sometimes that location is marked by a plaque or a statue, but other times we ...

Black History Month Musings: on Langston Hughes and the 'Best New Poets'

Terry Blackhawk | Posted 04.12.2014 | Detroit
Terry Blackhawk

African American poets gave a glimpse into what W.E.B. Dubois famously identified as 'The Souls of Black Folks.' Our students honored their poetic forbears which was also a manifesto about the importance of poetry in young people's lives.

Langston Hughes: A Life Dreamed in Letters

Afaa Michael Weaver | Posted 04.05.2014 | Black Voices
Afaa Michael Weaver

Hughes' was a courage we speak of when we speak of great people, people of an imponderable depth of spirit. He gave his life to his work, and to his people, and to his nation in the face of adversity that would crush most aspiring poets.

Maya Angelou Tells Funny Story Behind This Touching Photo

The Huffington Post | Melissa Jeltsen | Posted 01.23.2014 | Black Voices

A few days after poet Amiri Baraka died, Maya Angelou shared the humorous story behind a famous photo of the two friends dancing. According to her ...

Happy Birthday, Zora Neale Hurston!

Posted 01.23.2014 | Black Voices

Born on January 7th 1891, today marks author and activist Zora Neale Hurston's 123rd birthday. Google chose to honor the icon with a Google Doodle....

Review: Black Nativity

Dwight Brown | Posted 01.25.2014 | Black Voices
Dwight Brown

The blend of pop, soul and gospel is absolutely enchanting and will make the film's soundtrack a holiday classic.

12 Years to Remember

Dr. Tukufu Zuberi | Posted 01.23.2014 | Black Voices
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi

You wear the shackles for a journey that seems to stretch on and on. From the coast of Africa, the slave ship travels to the Americas. On the way to Philadelphia, you may stop and stay in the West Indies to be beaten and "broken."

Listen to This Book: The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975

Tom Semioli | Posted 01.23.2014 | Books
Tom Semioli

Thomas infuses his passion for the music, poetry, and recorded rhetoric with a weighty reverence for the events and attitudes that shaped a generation. His mission started out quite innocently.

On Our Tides of Freedom

Dr. Tukufu Zuberi | Posted 12.29.2013 | Black Voices
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi

You may be distracted by the buzz of the city traffic as you walk along Center City Philadelphia's Market Street. It's easy to walk by the historic marker in front of you when you turn onto Front Street. But this marker is worth seeing.

Remembering Famous People Who Changed Our Lives

Malcolm Boyd | Posted 11.12.2013 | Gay Voices
Malcolm Boyd

Memories. So many memories. Let's start an altogether fresh list of new people in our lives, shall we? Before long, perhaps we can turn them into an altogether new list of memories too.

Considering a Theme

Liz Madans | Posted 10.14.2013 | Books
Liz Madans

Langston Hughes allows brave and complex truths to appear on his page. To ignore the conversation of the hard things -- race, class, sex, disability and so on, and to send students onwards into the world without necessary words and frameworks for their lives is a disservice.

So Near and Yet So Far

Don Meyer, Ph.D. | Posted 10.07.2013 | College
Don Meyer, Ph.D.

Because of the fog, she could not see the coastline so she had no idea where she was. She soon found out, however, that she was less than a mile from the coast. She could have certainly reached it if she had just stayed in the water a few minutes longer.

Racism on Trial: Where Do You Stand?

David Bedrick | Posted 09.17.2013 | Black Voices
David Bedrick

egardless of your opinion about George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin, we mustn't ignore the underlying conversation -- a heated, potent, and critical discussion about race and racism.

Celebrating Progressive Patriotism on the Fourth of July

Peter Dreier | Posted 09.01.2013 | Politics
Peter Dreier

The flag, as a symbol of the nation, is not owned by the administration in power, but by the people. We battle over what it means, but all Americans have an equal right to claim the flag as their own. Progressives understand that people can disagree with their government and still love their country and its ideals.

The Dream Deferred

Adam Kirk Edgerton | Posted 07.22.2013 | Politics
Adam Kirk Edgerton

Tens of millions of Americans turned out to vote for a New New Deal in 2008. We turned out to vote against the nefarious budget-slashing of Mitt Romney in 2012. And what did we get?

Are Schools Dumbing Down the Common Core Standards?

E. D. Hirsch, Jr. | Posted 05.26.2013 | Impact
E. D. Hirsch, Jr.

The arguments against the Common Core State Standards grow ever more fierce -- as if kids' lives were already being wrecked, that useful experimentation were already being suppressed, and that schools were being forced to descend from their current level of excellence.

Ask Your Mama: Collaboration With Langston Hughes and Jessye Norman

Laura Karpman | Posted 05.18.2013 | Arts
Laura Karpman

I think, for me, the true joy, was that I was able to realize the vision of a great poet and thinker. Langston Hughes had a multimedia vision that was 50 years ahead of its time. "Ask Your Mama" broke a mold for him, which is why I think it was not performed in his lifetime.