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Literature

Reflections on My BOYSTOWN Series

Jake Biondi | Posted 12.19.2014 | Gay Voices
Jake Biondi

Once I recognized my passion for interesting characters and continuing storylines, an idea was born: What if I created my own continuing drama that consisted mainly of gay characters? I started to ponder the idea more and more, and in June 2013 I began writing my drama focused on gay characters, BOYSTOWN.

Kiran Desai: The World Arrived in Books

Louisiana Channel | Posted 12.16.2014 | Arts
Louisiana Channel

Because she spent her childhood in an India, that had not yet opened its doors to the larger world, Indian novelist, Kiran Desai, had only her knowledge from books to rely on, before she later became an immigrant.

Remembering a War Within the Korean War

John R. Eperjesi | Posted 12.10.2014 | Books
John R. Eperjesi

Rather than simply be read as celebrations of individual freedom, these novels ought to be understood as critiques of a divided Korea.

What Martin Scorsese's 'The 50 Year Argument' Tells Us About Today

Christine Deakers | Posted 12.08.2014 | Media
Christine Deakers

The 50 Year Argument, a literary documentary on The New York Review of Books directed by Martin Scorsese, available through HBO, is not necessarily the tour de force that only pats the intellectual echelon on its cashmere-and-tweed-backs, which some may expect.

Truly a Lady

Paula Gordon | Posted 12.03.2014 | Media
Paula Gordon

Meeting P.D. James made me rethink my aversion to titles I associate with monarchy. She was an authentic lady long before she was a Lady. She earned that title, of course, which made the honorific sweeter.

Copycat Culture: Adapting to a World of Adaptations

Evan Gottlieb | Posted 11.18.2014 | Books
Evan Gottlieb

When it comes to fiction -- which today includes television, movies, video games, and other narrative media -- copying someone else's ideas is nothing new.

The Woman Who Decided to Save the History of the Human Soul

Steven Crandell | Posted 11.21.2014 | Impact
Steven Crandell

Mary Conover Mellon was only 33 when she first heard a speech by Dr. Carl Jung, a pioneer in psychology and one of the great thinkers of the 20th century.

First Indian Literary Festival at Columbia a Hit

Jim Luce | Posted 11.17.2014 | Books
Jim Luce

Under the direction of my good friend Aroon Shivdasani, the first literary festival of the Indian American Arts Council (IAAC) with Columbia Universit...

3 New Books for the Skier's and Rider's Library

Liftopia | Posted 11.16.2014 | Travel
Liftopia

I don't know if you call it a "ski-brary" or a "librare-ski," but here are three books that we'd recommend adding to that dusty old stack of tattered ski literature sitting on your corner shelf.

Why Cornel West Loves Jane Austen

Kathleen Anderson | Posted 11.12.2014 | Books
Kathleen Anderson

A "great book," to West, is one that most effectively addresses "the challenge of trying to be a decent person in the world. There is no more fundamental question."

Art & the Tyranny of the New

Steven Crandell | Posted 11.06.2014 | Arts
Steven Crandell

I think it's time to create a market for art that deepens the spirit, not makes it shallower, a market to encourage art that taps into wisdom and truth that has lasted for generations, eons, as long as memory has served humanity.

10 Words Every Writer Needs To Know

Oliver Tearle | Posted 11.04.2014 | Books
Oliver Tearle

Here are ten unusual words that sum up the writing experience, and our attitudes to writing, in one way or another.

Celebrating Words and Wordsmiths in Mumbai

Pranay Gupte | Posted 11.04.2014 | Books
Pranay Gupte

Indeed, it's tempting to say that of all the 70 or so literary and artistic festivals that are held in India annually, the Mumbai LitFest certainly has become the "maximum." Don't miss it next year. I won't.

The Next Step Is Oblivion: The Future of Gay Literature

Marten Weber | Posted 11.03.2014 | Gay Voices
Marten Weber

Without the stigma, much of what we have written about in the last hundred years will be largely irrelevant. We won't be suffering, suicidal, sex-crazed perverts anymore; we will be loving, caring, responsible individuals, even in the mind of the reading public. It may be some way off, but we are getting there. What, then, will happen to literature?

Why Are People So Drawn To Fiction?

The Atlantic | Cody C. Delistraty | Posted 11.03.2014 | World

When an English archaeologist named George Smith was 31 years old, he became enchanted with an ancient tablet in the British Museum. Years earlier, in...

Our Favorite Ghost Stories

The New York Public Library | Posted 10.28.2014 | New York
The New York Public Library

There is nothing quite so fine as a tried and true ghost story -- one that sends shivers down the spine while you hide under the covers.

My Salute to Librarians

Warren Adler | Posted 10.27.2014 | Books
Warren Adler

From the moment I entered the hushed, sacred precinct of the Brownsville Children's Library in Brownsville, Brooklyn, back in the mid-1930s, I have been a passionate advocate of the public library.

Metamodernism: The Basics III

Seth Abramson | Posted 12.19.2014 | Books
Seth Abramson

Reading all of the foregoing, one might wonder, "How can metamodernism claim to enable a vertical layering of ideas and identities in which no idea or identity is privileged over the others, when by all rights that should be both a physical and metaphysical impossibility?"

Metamodernism: The Basics II

Seth Abramson | Posted 12.14.2014 | Books
Seth Abramson

The first major change in metamodernism since 2010 is a growing feeling that "metamodernism," as a system of logic, is a recurring phenomenon rather than one that's especially tied to a single moment in world history.

9 Books That Steve Jobs Thought Everybody Should Read

Business Insider | Drake Baer | Posted 10.15.2014 | World

Why did Apple think different? Because, Steve Jobs said while introducing the iPad, the Mac maker was never just a tech company. "The reason t...

Metamodernism: The Basics

Seth Abramson | Posted 12.12.2014 | Books
Seth Abramson

We live in a time in which we feel very isolated. The Internet is partly to blame; every day we say things online -- things that isolate others, and things that isolate us from others -- that are so unkind or merely thoughtless that we would never say them face-to-face.

The State of Risk in PoMo Verse (Part 2)

Seth Abramson | Posted 12.07.2014 | Books
Seth Abramson

The politics of literary metamodernism presently resides in the same transitional and paradoxical state that the work itself does, and that its authors most certainly do.

Beyond Guinness in Dublin, Part One: The Arts

Edward Schneider | Posted 12.03.2014 | Travel
Edward Schneider

We arranged most of our time in Dublin with the arts and history in mind, and in those areas the place shines, as it does in urban beauty, walkability and general pleasantness -- thanks in no small part to its populace, who live up to their reputation for easy friendliness.

The State of Risk in PoMo Verse

Seth Abramson | Posted 12.01.2014 | Books
Seth Abramson

In Cheap Signaling -- a serious and important study of poetic diction in the avant-garde -- Daniel Tiffany posits a revolutionary poetics without positing, too, a paradigm shift away from postmodernism.

No End: Richard Fulco Talks Music, New York and Writing His First Novel

Elford Alley | Posted 11.30.2014 | Books
Elford Alley

Music blogger and playwright Richard Fulco has recently released his debut novel, There Is No End to This Slope. The book is equal parts love letter and bitter reproach to New York, as seen through the eyes of his struggling protagonist, John Lenza. Richard talks about the unexpected challenges of completing his first novel while balancing work and family.