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Marshall Fine Movie Review

HuffPost Review: Four Lions

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Terrorism is no joking matter -- and yet the hapless jihadis in Chris Morris' gruesomely hilarious Four Lions had me giggling and laughing out loud at its blend of slapstick and smart bad-taste humor.

HuffPost Review: For Colored Girls

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Saying that For Colored Girls is the most disciplined, least clownish film that Tyler Perry has made -- his best film to date -- is faint praise indeed. And that's how it's meant.

HuffPost Review: Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Alex Gibney's film makes the case is that, while Spitzer absolutely did the things he admitted, he was the target of right-wing-powered federal investigations into relatively minor tax infractions.

HuffPost Review: Due Date

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

With Due Date, the audience will find itself in the not-unfamiliar situation of watching a comedy whose best jokes have been given away in the commercials and trailers for the film.

Movie Review: 127 Hours

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Yeah, OK, Danny Boyle's 127 Hours is the movie about the guy who cut his arm off. But it's not just a movie about a guy cutting off his arm. Rather...

Movie Review: Fair Game

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Doug Liman's Fair Game is both a compelling and an infuriating film, for a couple of reasons. For starters, it's true - and yet the victims of this s...

HuffPost Review: Inspector Bellamy

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Who better to play a delicate bull than Depardieu? In middle age, he is approaching the girth of late-life Brando or Welles; yet he's lost none of his vitality.

Movie Review: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Is Lisbeth Salander the most fascinating female literary -- or movie -- character of all time? Certainly, Stieg Larsson's punk-hacker heroine is right up there in the pantheon.

HuffPost Review: Wild Target

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

There aren't many people working in films right now who have the mastery of droll, deadpan humor that Bill Nighy possesses. So Wild Target should be right up his alley. It is. Unfortunately, that alley is mostly a dead-end affair.

HuffPost Review: Welcome to the Rileys

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Welcome to the Rileys isn't world-beating cinema. But it's a beautifully understated story with deep emotion that will capture the receptive viewer with surprising force.

HuffPost Review: Inhale

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

A movie that won't win any awards from the Mexican-American Border Tourism board, Inhale takes the idea of organ-transplant tourism and drops it squarely in the middle of a dramatic thriller. It's not a comfortable fit.

HuffPost Review: Nora's Will

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

In Nora's Will, what starts as a comedy of one man's rebellion against what is expected of him turns into a moving story in which his understanding of his own life blossoms.

HuffPost Review: Jackass 3D

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

One of my most amusing memories as a member of the New York Film Critics Circle is the 2002 voting meeting, at which we selected our award-winners - a...

Movie Review: Carlos -- Glamorizing Terrorism

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

There's been a lot of excitement about Olivier Assayas' Carlos, and it's not hard to see why. But here's my objection: In presenting a terrorist as an action hero, it glorifies terrorism as a legitimate path of political action.

Movie Review: Conviction

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Conviction is as straightforward as storytelling gets in a movie. Will that be its undoing with critics?

Movie Review: Red

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

It's not that Red is a breakthrough or a game-changer in any way -- it's just a highly enjoyable comic action-thriller with a sense of humor about itself.

Movie Review: Hereafter

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

At the age of 80, Clint Eastwood just keeps pulling surprises out of his back pocket as a director -- the latest being Hereafter, Eastwood's version of a New-Agey entry.

HuffPost Review: Tamara Drewe

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

You don't need to be a fan of Thomas Hardy to get the jokes in Stephen Frears' Tamara Drewe. Nor do you need to be familiar with Posey Simmonds' graph...

HuffPost Review: Life as We Know It

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

You know where Live as We Know It is headed every step of the way. Yet the writers and Berlanti find the right pace and tone, and the stars are equal to the task.

HuffPost Review: Stone

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Stone is a stunner -- a film that seems to be one thing but turns out to be quite another. It challenges your assumptions at every turn -- and leaves you wrung out at the end.

Movie Review: Secretariat

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Just as you'd imagine with a family-targeted movie about a horse, Randall Wallace's Secretariat is awash in sentimentality. The lump in your throat is as pro forma as the popcorn.

Movie Review: Inside Job

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Inside Job explains complex ideas with a clarity and skill that make them comprehensible to anyone willing to pay attention. But Charles Ferguson does it in a way that doesn't dumb things down.

HuffPost Review: Nowhere Boy

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Nowhere Boy, Sam Taylor-Wood's exploration of John Lennon's late teens, doesn't cover much new ground. But it does offer a pop psychology look at Lennon's confused home life.

HuffPost Review: Freakonomics

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

As anthology films go, Freakonomics is an entertaining -- if occasionally scattershot -- documentary. But then, that was the nature of the book by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, upon which the film was based.

Movie Review: Let Me In

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

American remakes of foreign films? That would be a 'no' vote. Having said that, I can heartily recommend Let Me In, the moody, touching American remake of the Swedish vampire film, Let the Right One In, from 2008.