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Medicine

It's Not Just the Genes

Eric E. Schadt | Posted 01.23.2014 | Science
Eric E. Schadt

In a relatively new field called multiscale biology, big data is helping us learn from a massive body of information, as well as the networks they form that define the complex biological processes at play within any living system, that we could not have understood if we stuck with looking at smaller collections of factors in isolation.

The Bad Guys

Derek Sherman | Posted 01.23.2014 | Books
Derek Sherman

I don't mean to blow the ending of your book or movie for you, but it's very possible that the villain is a drug company. In today's entertainment, they are the bad guys.

Alzheimer's May Be Detected 5 Years Before Symptoms Start

Posted 10.17.2013 | Fifty

Doctors may be able to predict if you'll develop Alzheimer's even before the early symptoms start, giving you a fighting chance against the disease. R...

Louisville Premieres New Program to Fight Pulmonary Disease

Keith Runyon | Posted 01.23.2014 | Healthy Living
Keith Runyon

On hot summer days, when the stagnant, humid air of this old river city hangs like a shroud, even people with healthy lungs find themselves gasping. F...

Health Study Shows It May Not Be Possible to Know Everything

Martha Lufkin | Posted 01.23.2014 | Comedy
Martha Lufkin

After I read that a new study had found health benefits from drinking coffee, I sprang from the table and brewed myself a cup of strong Yemeni espresso. I had downed almost the entire contents when the radio news came on. The broadcaster announced that a recent health study had discovered that if you drank too much coffee, it could kill you.

The One Thing They Never Tell You About Medical School

Hammad Moses Khan | Posted 01.23.2014 | College
Hammad Moses Khan

There's one thing that no medical student panel touches on and no physician you shadow ever tells you about. It's the sirens. No one ever talks about the sirens. The high-pitched sounds that wail from the tops of ambulances stand as stark reminders of the fact that what we're learning is real.

Tune In, Turn On And Meet Your Doctor

Tae Yoo | Posted 12.15.2013 | Impact
Tae Yoo

According to Time Magazine, 15 million children live in rural enclaves where the ratio of pediatricians and family physicians is 22 for every 100,000 kids. That's a patient load of more than 4,500 children per doctor. Outside the U.S., those numbers drastically increase.

Saving Lives From Afar: Bridging The Knowledge (& Distance) Gaps In Health Care With The Cloud

Jeffrey Burns, MD | Posted 01.23.2014 | Technology
Jeffrey Burns, MD

It was a child who nearly died that made me realize just how drastically my profession had to change. Because nearly 8 million children died in 2010 before reaching the age of five, in large part because of imminently treatable illnesses, and because 57 countries globally are facing a human resources health crisis and of those countries, each only has 1.13 doctors per 1,000 inhabitants, compared with 13.22 per 1,000 in the U.S.

The Epigenetics of Being Black and Feeling Blue: Understanding African American Vulnerability to Disease

Darron T. Smith, Ph.D. | Posted 01.23.2014 | Black Voices
Darron T. Smith, Ph.D.

Significant health care challenges are among the forms of white on black discrimination. In the absence of sweeping governmental reforms that place human rights over property rights, African Americans must take greater ownership in their own health care by becoming better informed.

The National Health Debt

William T. Talman, MD | Posted 01.23.2014 | Science
William T. Talman, MD

Federal funding for research is drying up faster than a parched desert after a rain. Its continual deterioration provides a frightening view of our country's lost sense of priorities.

5 Women Who Should Have Won the Nobel Prize

Anna Leahy | Posted 01.23.2014 | Science
Anna Leahy

It's Nobel Prize season! The three big science categories -- physiology or medicine, physics, and chemistry--were just announced on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Of the eight science winners, how many are women? Zero!

3 Ways The ‘Internet of Everything' Is Improving Our World

Kathy Mulvany | Posted 01.23.2014 | Impact
Kathy Mulvany

In Jordan, through Cisco HealthPresence, doctors and patients can see and speak to one another from distant clinical settings as if they are face-to-face. Network-connected medical devices -- such as thermometers, stethoscopes, and handheld cameras -- route patient information from the clinic to the hospital for instant access to critical data by medical specialists.

Tackling Children's Health Problems With Technology And Collaboration

Yu Yi | Posted 01.23.2014 | Impact
Yu Yi

Children's health care is a growing concern on a domestic and global scale among parents, specialists, and policymakers. Treating this special population, particularly among those living in rural communities, ignites continual challenges including insurance concerns, limited transportation, and the low number and availability of pediatric specialists. Working to overcome these challenges can help ensure that every child reaches his or her full potential.

The Gift of Our Wounds

Rose Kumar, M.D. | Posted 01.23.2014 | Healthy Living
Rose Kumar, M.D.

A few nights ago, I had a dream that me, my children and ex-husband were driving down the road in our car (when I was still married to him). My daugh...

Why Walmart Must Help to End Antibiotic Abuse in Farming

Andrew Gunther | Posted 01.23.2014 | Green
Andrew Gunther

By continuing to turn a blind eye to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics among its meat suppliers in the name of producing so-called cheap meat, Walmart is effectively sanctioning the inevitable rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The Three-Year MD: A Radical Rethinking of Medical Education

Robert I. Grossman, MD | Posted 12.02.2013 | College
Robert I. Grossman, MD

We argue for the radical rethinking of medical education, and suggest that shortening medical school education is one approach to address the need for change in the post-Flexnerian era. Doing so would offer highly qualified students the opportunity to fulfill their medical school requirements in three years, without compromising the quality of their education.

Why Animal Experimentation Doesn't Work. Reason 3: Animals Aren't Little Humans

Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H. | Posted 01.23.2014 | Science
Aysha Akhtar, M.D., M.P.H.

Your child, my father, and all of our loved ones who may be suffering from illnesses are not rats or dogs or monkeys. So why do animal experimenters keep treating them as though they are?

Poison Or Medicine?

John Berardi, Ph.D. | Posted 11.29.2013 | Healthy Living
John Berardi, Ph.D.

When it comes to heart disease risk, caffeinated coffee can actually be a "poison" for one person. And a "medicine" for another. It all depends on one little gene.

One Oath to Unite Us

Sarah O'Leary | Posted 11.25.2013 | Business
Sarah O'Leary

When the dedicated, expert hospital staff saves a life -- yet the survivor loses all of his assets down a fiscal rabbit hole because of wildly inflated medical bills -- how is the hospital honoring its vow?

Autism: A Whole Body Disorder?

Arshya Vahabzadeh, M.D. | Posted 11.23.2013 | Healthy Living
Arshya Vahabzadeh, M.D.

It does appear that there is growing evidence linking autism, an abnormally functioning immune system, and a variety of medical conditions. The exact associations, so far, elude our understanding.

Why I Gave Up Peanut Butter Cups Forever

Leo Brown | Posted 11.20.2013 | Healthy Living
Leo Brown

I wouldn't be here today without Western medicine, but we have a long road to the place where patients have the information they need, where doctors won't hesitate to tell it how it is, and where corporate interests have been purged from public health conversations of massive economic and social importance.

Are You Going to Be a Specialist? Or Just a GP?

Penny Wilson | Posted 11.17.2013 | Healthy Living
Penny Wilson

I'm not "just" a GP. I'm a broadly-skilled, sub-specialized, expert GP, providing a damn fine health service to my patients and my community. And I absolutely love it.

Health Care 101: Dealing With a Medical Error

Brian Secemsky, M.D. | Posted 11.12.2013 | Healthy Living
Brian Secemsky, M.D.

While caring for Ms. A overnight, I made the incorrect decision to administer a cardiac medication to treat her disease that is known to increase the risk of bleeding during surgery. Committing and dealing with a medical error is one of the more humbling experiences in the field of medicine.

Teens Need More Awareness of High-Growth Careers in STEM, Medical and Dental Fields

Jack E. Kosakowski | Posted 11.12.2013 | Impact
Jack E. Kosakowski

There are many rewarding career opportunities available to our youth, but we must do a better job of educating them about those opportunities.

Doctor, How Do You Feel?

Nandita Mani | Posted 11.10.2013 | Impact
Nandita Mani

In these formative years, students are like sponges, constantly absorbing clues from their superiors on how medicine should be practiced. Can we really expect medical students to retain their empathy if we don't show them how?