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Steven Pinker

Colleges Don't Need More Tests or More 'Sheep'

Michael Roth | Posted 09.19.2014 | College
Michael Roth

Our colleges and universities aspire to help students to find what John Dewey called "the large and human significance" in their lives and work. This requires not just teaching to the test and not just parroting critiques. It requires learning to think with contexts and concepts, deploying cooperation and creativity.

Why the Soul Is Tiptoeing Back Into the Conversation

Stafford Betty | Posted 08.07.2014 | Religion
Stafford Betty

Mind-body dualism, or the belief, roughly speaking, that we are a combination of body and soul, is not exactly coming back into respectability in leading philosophical circles, but it does show signs of tiptoeing back into the conversation.

The Common Core: Disabling Compassion

T. Elijah Hawkes | Posted 08.19.2014 | Education
T. Elijah Hawkes

What would James Baldwin, one of America's greatest non-fiction writers, have to say about the Common Core expectation that a high school senior's reading diet be 70 percent non-fiction text?

How to Be a 21st Century Peace Activist

Allyson Stroschein | Posted 04.10.2014 | Impact
Allyson Stroschein

The second question you must ask to be a 21st peace activist is: What should I do about it? In other words, what meaningful actions can I take (given my specific life circumstances) to make the biggest impact on peace in the world?

Our Foraging Ancestors Were Not Particularly War-like

Rob Brooks | Posted 10.01.2013 | Science
Rob Brooks

Few subjects more predictably animate furious disagreement and cross-purposes discussion than the origins of human warfare. Are people "naturally" belligerent? And what does that even mean? The question taps a deep old well of ideological intuition.

Pause to Recognize Global Progress

Howard Steven Friedman | Posted 03.22.2013 | World
Howard Steven Friedman

There are most certainly major issues in the world and we need to remain constantly vigilant. At the same time, there is a lack of recognition that humanity has made great strides forward in the past few decades.

From Delhi to D.C.: How Women Can Fight Back

Barbara & Shannon Kelley | Posted 03.16.2013 | Women
Barbara & Shannon Kelley

Will having more women in high-level positions eliminate all gender violence? No. But there's a link between seeing women in power -- and empowered -- and seeing them as equals.

(R)evolution in Frankfurt: Heide Hatry's Not a Rose Delivers Interactivity to a New Standard

Lisa Paul Streitfeld | Posted 12.12.2012 | Arts
Lisa Paul Streitfeld

The project delivers a new paradigm of life/death/rebirth cycle into the avant-garde, marrying the organic and ephemeral that once limited the archival potential of feminist art into the masculine realm of digital technology.

An Education in Creative Courage

Thomas Fisher | Posted 12.02.2012 | Education
Thomas Fisher

See the WWW Conference as an educational wake-up call. School should be about equipping students not just with the skills, but also with the self-confidence to pursue their passions, regardless of what others may think.

Confessions of a Homo sapiens Chauvinist

Steven Paul Leiva | Posted 11.04.2012 | Science
Steven Paul Leiva

We are a cognizant, intelligent, contemplating species, possibly the only such species in the universe. Even if we aren't, we should act as if we are that precious. Our purpose, then, should be to thrive and to be the universe's means of self-contemplation, to be the mind of the universe.

Do We Need Faith To Believe In Progress?

Andrew Z. Cohen | Posted 06.25.2012 | Religion
Andrew Z. Cohen

When it comes to telling us how to relate to some of our biggest global challenges, I wonder if the most spiritually enlightened among us might be missing the boat right now.

Pinker: Pollyanna of Peace?

John Feffer | Posted 03.25.2012 | World
John Feffer

In his new book, the Harvard psychologist urges us to ignore what we read, what we see, and what our common sense is telling us. The world is not getting more violent. In fact, the world has become demonstrably less violent.

Pinker's Dirty War on Prehistoric Peace

Christopher Ryan | Posted 03.10.2012 | Science
Christopher Ryan

Human beings tend to assume that whatever group they happen to comprise is self-evidently the best, God's chosen ones -- and everyone else's equally passionately held belief that they are the chosen few is simply delusional.

'The Most Significant And Least Appreciated Development In The History Of Our Species'

AP | By SETH BORENSTEIN | Posted 12.22.2011 | World

WASHINGTON -- It seems as if violence is everywhere, but it's really on the run. Yes, thousands of people have died in bloody unrest from Africa to P...

Meet 7 Celebrity Professors Teaching At Britain's Controversial New University

Posted 08.06.2011 | College

The controversial and incredibly expensive (at least for British standards) New College of the Humanities has lined up an imposing array of academics ...

Myth-Busting Book About Sex, Marriage, Family, and Celebrity Scholars

Bella DePaulo | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Bella DePaulo

Sex at Dawn fearlessly takes on some of the most fundamental assumptions of evolutionary psychology and some of the most basic beliefs of our time.

The Internet Won't Damage Your Brain: But It Might Ruin Your Life

Dave Pell | Posted 05.25.2011 | Technology
Dave Pell

We're really talking about two Internets here. Pinker's internet -- a mass media repository of knowledge and creativity that should be embraced. And the other internet that can ruin your dinner (and your life).

Omega Institute Comes to NYC for a Weekend of Renewal

Marcia G. Yerman | Posted 11.17.2011 | Healthy Living
Marcia G. Yerman

Elizabeth Lesser presented one of her resonant themes - the "Phoenix" metaphor and the concept of letting go of past issues that deter us from rising and regenerating. Introducing herself to the jam-packed room with the remark, "I'm a mystical, introverted kind of girl," she launched into the renewal philosophy.

Malcolm Gladwell and the Case For Endless Self-Googling

David Quigg | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
David Quigg

I piled cringe upon cringe Friday -- first because I read Steven Pinker's vivisection of Malcolm Gladwell's new collection, second because of what I found when I Googled a flub Pinker wielded against Gladwell.

Malcolm Gladwell's "What The Dog Saw"

The New York Times | STEVEN PINKER | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books

Fortunately for "What the Dog Saw," the essay format is a better showcase for Gladwell's talents, because the constraints of length and editors yield ...