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Xi Jinping

Michael Calderone

Chinese President Suggests News Outlets Are The Ones To Blame For Visa Problems

HuffingtonPost.com | Michael Calderone | Posted 11.12.2014 | Media

NEW YORK -– Chinese President Xi Jinping suggested Wednesday that international news outlets are at fault when it comes to problems securing visas f...

The Climate Breakthrough in Beijing Gives the World a Fighting Chance

Jeffrey Sachs | Posted 11.14.2014 | Green
Jeffrey Sachs

While the full ramifications will only be known at the climate summit in Paris in December 2015, the two largest C02 emitters have finally spoken, and most importantly, they've spoken together.

U.S., China Unveil Ambitious Climate Change Goals

AP | JOSH LEDERMAN | Posted 11.12.2014 | Politics

BEIJING (AP) — The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum int...

After Aquino: Time for 'Effective Governance' in the Philippines

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 11.11.2014 | World
Richard Javad Heydarian

Democracy is not only about freely choosing your leaders; it is also about choosing the best possible leaders, who can effectively oversee day-to-day administration.

Japan-China Ties Are Still Fragile After Leaders Meet

AP | KEN MORITSUGU | Posted 11.11.2014 | World

TOKYO (AP) — What happens next in Japan-China relations depends not only on what they do, but also on what they don't do. A tentative, some would s...

Why the China/Russia Rapprochement Won't Last

Daniel Wagner | Posted 11.11.2014 | World
Daniel Wagner

Being a big believer in the lessons taught by history, I'm inclined to think that the current 'love fest' between China and Russia will probably have a limited shelf life.

Brzezinski: Why We Need a U.S.-China 'Pacific Charter' for Global Stability

Nathan Gardels | Posted 12.18.2014 | World
Nathan Gardels

In Beijing on Monday, U.S. President Barack Obama called on China to be a "partner in underwriting the international order" instead of "undermining" it. One key American strategist, Zbigniew Brzezinski, who was national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter, is strongly promoting the idea that Obama's notion should be pushed further and formalized into a "Pacific Charter."

After the Icy Handshake, What Comes Next?

Yanmei Xie | Posted 11.10.2014 | World
Yanmei Xie

Now that Xi and Abe have had their icy handshake, China and Japan need to move forward. Hotlines are necessary, but so is continued leadership: for President Xi, to ensure that anti-Japanese nationalism does not dictate policy towards Tokyo; for Prime Minister Abe, to tamp down tendencies towards historical revisionism.

Leaders Of China And Japan Hold Ice-Breaking Meeting

AP | CHRISTOPHER BODEEN | Posted 11.10.2014 | World

BEIJING (AP) — An uneasy handshake Monday between Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe marked the first meeting betwe...

Brzezinski: Obama Should Seek 'New Opening To China' To Balance Putin's Russia

Politico | Michael Hirsh | Posted 11.07.2014 | World

At 85, Zbigniew Brzezinski is still the Democratic Party’s best answer to Henry Kissinger. As a global strategist, he has a well-deserved reputation...

The Axiom Report: Cybersecurity and Its Impact on China-U.S. Relations

Franz-Stefan Gady | Posted 11.05.2014 | Politics
Franz-Stefan Gady

While the actual impact of the Novetta report on making U.S. systems more secure from Chinese attacks in the long run will be negligible on the diplomatic front, the recent Axiom revelations will allow the U.S. government to press the Chinese side harder on contentious cybersecurity issues.

Squaring the Circle: Rule According to Law in a One-Party State

Minxin Pei | Posted 11.26.2014 | World
Minxin Pei

The greatest dilemma facing the Chinese government in its long-standing efforts to build an effective legal system is how to ensure both the integrity of the judiciary and the Communist Party's monopoly of power.

Xi Has Had Enough of 'Weird' Architecture -- And So Have I

Jia (Chinese: 嘉; Pinyin: Jiā) | Posted 11.26.2014 | World
Jia (Chinese: 嘉; Pinyin: Jiā)

Most of the Chinese artists who attended his speech on the arts were older than Xi himself. Communication between such figures who use the old Communist Party language, and the most active population--now under 40 and with no firsthand experience of the Cultural Revolution -- is practically impossible.

The Global Search for Education: China Comes to New York

C. M. Rubin | Posted 12.24.2014 | Education
C. M. Rubin

The number of Chinese students seeking to be educated in the West has received significant media attention in recent years, but what about the flipside? What will this mean for the further development of higher education institutions in modern China and for their influence with educators and students around the world?

China's Millionaires Are Fleeing. Here's Why

Wang Yong | Posted 12.23.2014 | World
Wang Yong

China has become the world's second biggest economy in the past 30 years, but has failed to grow into a state under the rule of law.

Jackson Connor

President Xi Holding Umbrella Wins China's Top Photo Prize

HuffingtonPost.com | Jackson Connor | Posted 10.23.2014 | Media

Umbrellas have figured prominently in Chinese politics in recent weeks. On Wednesday, a photograph of President Xi Jinping standing in the rain, p...

China Vows To Strengthen Judicial System

AP | By DIDI TANG | Posted 12.24.2014 | World

BEIJING (AP) — China's ruling Communist Party announced steps Thursday to improve judicial independence and check political interference in the cour...

ISIS, Ukraine, the South China Sea and the End of the Era of American Power

David Paul | Posted 12.19.2014 | Politics
David Paul

Shock and Awe was the name for the onslaught of missiles and bombing that was to initiate the U.S. invasion and would intimidate Saddam, quickly bringing his regime into submission. Little did we know that the opening days of the second Iraq war marked the end of the era of America as the world's dominant military power.

Answering Four Key Questions About China's Rise

Fu Ying | Posted 12.17.2014 | World
Fu Ying

China may join in discussions about hotspot issues with the aim of seeking a peaceful solution, but it will not turn into a party involved in the conflict or take steps that make the problem worse.

China's Silk Road Revival -- and the Fears It Stirs -- Are Deeply Rooted in the Country's History

Shashi Tharoor | Posted 12.14.2014 | World
Shashi Tharoor

The modern Silk Road's establishment will mark a step toward reinvigorating the ancient Chinese concept of tianxia, in which the Chinese emperor was considered the divinely appointed ruler of the entire known world.

Would America's Founding Fathers Consider Hong Kong's Election Plan Democratic?

Stephen Macedo | Posted 12.08.2014 | World
Stephen Macedo

No matter how wide the franchise and how hotly contested the election, if the eligible candidates are vetted on an undemocratic basis then the election is not democratic.

Hong Kong's Protesters: Pragmatism or Passion?

Tom Doctoroff | Posted 12.03.2014 | Politics
Tom Doctoroff

For the past week, the commercial arteries of Hong Kong have been clogged with (mostly) student demonstrators clamoring for "democracy." What is the end game here? I predict resolution, albeit one unsatisfying to most Westerners as well as a minority of Hong Kong citizens who aspire an American brand of democracy.

Taiwan Warily Eyes Battle of Wills Between Beijing and Hong Kong

Kevin A. Lees | Posted 12.03.2014 | Politics
Kevin A. Lees

In Hong Kong, they may be protesting with umbrellas, but in Taiwan earlier this year, it was sunflowers. Hong Kong's protesters know as well as PRC policymakers that Taiwan is still watching very closely, and Beijing's wrong-footed response in Hong Kong today could halt Ma's push for greater Taiwanese cooperation.

Looking at Hong Kong from My Personal Memories of Tiananmen Square

Jia (Chinese: 嘉; Pinyin: Jiā) | Posted 12.02.2014 | World
Jia (Chinese: 嘉; Pinyin: Jiā)

A terrible irony is that, seen in the relatively short term of 25 years, the Tiananmen Square event didn't help the cause of China's progress to democracy, but seems to have led the government to take China to an opposite extreme. One possibility is that Hong Kong protestors will be compelled to give in if the region is to function at all, and the cycle of post-1989 China will repeat itself with more restrictions and less freedom.

Why Xi Should Give In (But Probably Won't)

Rory Truex | Posted 12.02.2014 | World
Rory Truex

Recent accounts suggest that both sides are growing impatient. Tiananmen II seems unlikely, but even a single death would go viral, and could be enough to tip public opinion decisively against the regime. Ignoring the protesters might do more damage than simply appeasing them.