iOS app Android app

Yugoslavia

Iraq, Syria, and Today's Other Killfests: The Great War as the Tragic Gift that Keeps on Giving

Doug Bandow | Posted 07.08.2014 | World
Doug Bandow

The morning of June 28, 1914 dawned bright for most Europeans. By sunset a geopolitical cataclysm loomed. World War I demonstrated the importance of saying no. Any of the great powers could have stopped the march toward war. America could have refused to join the parade after it started. The world would have been a better place had one or all done so. Today, Washington is filled with routine proposals for new interventions: bombing campaigns, foreign invasions, and military occupations. Most seem unlikely to trigger a new world war. But a century ago no one expected an assassination in a distant Balkan province to do so either. That is reason enough for Americans to make war truly a last resort.

The Magical Dolphins of Slovenia

Sidonie Sawyer | Posted 07.01.2014 | Travel
Sidonie Sawyer

The first time I saw dolphins was in Slovenia, when it was still called Yugoslavia, while on vacation with my parents. We lived in Paris and most summers my parents rented a small flat of two rooms in the coastal village of Piran, where we usually spent a few weeks at the time.

The Misrule of Law in Croatia

John Feffer | Posted 06.25.2014 | World
John Feffer

Natasha Srdoc, who has done stints in international banking, the think tank world, and politics, is a firm believer in free market capitalism. She doesn't think what took place in former Yugoslavia comes anywhere close to her understanding of how capitalism works.

Can Muslim UN Human Rights Chief Save Humanity From Itself?

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey | Posted 06.18.2014 | World
Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey

The challenge for both Muslims and the international community is to counter the hijacking of the Muslim identity by extremists and also to respond to the victimization of all, including Muslims who are targeted by bigotry as well co-coreligionists.

Blame it on Rio, or Sarajevo?

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey | Posted 06.09.2014 | World
Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey

War more likely in the Balkans or sex in Brazil, turned into an unexpected UN Security Council debate. Is promiscuity for conflict, sex or soccer something embedded in our genes, culture or environment? Some stereotypes perhaps are better, or more accurately less harmful, but in the end they become a hurdle.

Tradition and History Matter to Albanians

David L. Phillips | Posted 06.05.2014 | World
David L. Phillips

Today Kosova is free. It is, however, a flawed state with serious problems. Every UN Member State should recognize Kosova's independence, but only 106 have recognized it so far. Now is the time for Kosovars to vote and express their determination for reform.

This Is Not a Transition

John Feffer | Posted 05.23.2014 | World
John Feffer

If the origins of the "transition" were hazy, the trajectory was even more so. Yugoslavia's "transition" was certainly very different from its neighbors, for it seemed to move directly backward from the 1990s into the blood politics of the 1940s.

Too Bad Ukraine Didn't Keep Its 2,000 Nuclear Weapons

Blake Fleetwood | Posted 06.30.2014 | Politics
Blake Fleetwood

The U.S. should tone down the rhetoric and concentrate on the core issues for worldwide peace and accept the Crimean reality. The solution will evolve slowly, if we let it.

Bridging the East-West Divide

John Feffer | Posted 06.25.2014 | World
John Feffer

In the 1970s and 1980s, the West European peace and environmental movement reached out, tentatively at first and then more vigorously, to the dissident groups in Eastern Europe. Nowhere was this more evident than in West Germany. Eva Quistorp was a driving force behind the east-west dialogue.

Former Yugoslavian Army Jet Fighter Pilot Recalls UFO Encounters

Alejandro Rojas | Posted 06.02.2014 | Weird News
Alejandro Rojas

Just then the object zipped out to the west, decreasing in size and luminosity, and then it was gone. Hamzić says what impressed him was that the craft must have been moving between 2,500-4,000 mph.

The Russians Are Not Coming

Reese Schonfeld | Posted 05.28.2014 | Politics
Reese Schonfeld

All around me, from pundits to presidents, I hear fear of, and loathing for, Vladimir Putin. I do not believe that that's the proper attitude, and I base my opinion on what I've learned from three men, Pat Buchanan, Igor Makunin and Dmitry Medvedev.

Going Organic in Slovenia

John Feffer | Posted 05.16.2014 | World
John Feffer

I visited Slovenia to do a report on organic farming for the Bay Area-based organization Food First. I was drawn to the former Yugoslav republic because it had recently joined with several neighboring Italian and Austrian provinces to create the world's first organic bioregion.

Crimea Is Not Kosovo

David L. Phillips | Posted 05.10.2014 | World
David L. Phillips

There are fundamental legal and political differences between the internationally sanctioned process, which culminated in Kosovo's independence, and Russia's land-grab in Crimea. Kosovo's independence is based on international law; Russia's annexation of Crimea is not.

Addressing War Crimes in Former Yugoslavia

John Feffer | Posted 04.21.2014 | Politics
John Feffer

Yugoslavia fell apart in stages, and violence accompanied each of these stages. To assess these crimes and determine culpability, even as the wars continued to rage, the United Nations established the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in 1993. It was the first war crimes tribunal since the end of World War II.

Ukraine's Fight Is Europe's Battle

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey | Posted 03.02.2014 | World
Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey

The confrontation in Kiev is the focus. Less discussed, Putin's Kremlin has sought to block closer economic and political ties between the EU and several other states that it dominated during the Soviet Union.

Germany's Post-Reunification Foreign Policy

John Feffer | Posted 02.26.2014 | World
John Feffer

In general, Germany has kept its head down and focused a great deal on domestic issues.

YU-Rock!

John Feffer | Posted 02.12.2014 | World
John Feffer

In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, a "republic of letters" created a common intellectual language across countries and, indeed, across the Atlantic between Europe and the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, a similar non-territorial republic emerged in Yugoslavia.

WATCH: Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer Speaks On War Crimes

The Aspen Institute | Posted 11.11.2013 | Politics

This post came to us from our partner, The Aspen Institute. During the rule of the Khmer Rouge from 1975-1979, an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians ...

The Red Queen: Jovanka Broz 1924-2013

Jasmina Tesanovic | Posted 01.23.2014 | World
Jasmina Tesanovic

She was the last living icon of the former Yugoslavia. Jovanka Broz died at the age of 89, and was buried in Belgrade in the tomb of her husband, Marshal Tito.

Thessaloniki -- Heart of Macedonia

Barry D. Wood | Posted 01.23.2014 | World
Barry D. Wood

It is tragic that a geo-political argument prevents Thessaloniki from being fully integrated with its traditional hinterland. The problem is the rancorous, silly dispute between the Macedonian region of former Yugoslavia and Greece that has dragged on, impeding regional progress for two decades.

Passions v. Interests in Former Yugoslavia

John Feffer | Posted 12.10.2013 | World
John Feffer

The disintegration of Yugoslavia was a triumph of nationalist passions over political interests. If the latter had prevailed, the process would at least have proceeded peacefully, as was the case with Czechoslovakia. Instead, three wars took place one after the other.

Obama And Syria: Learning the Lessons of Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan

Richard Brodsky | Posted 09.03.2013 | Politics
Richard Brodsky

The real world tends to expose flaws in the best theories. Syria has done just that. However we come out on this debate, Obama's decision to delay action until Congress acts matters. His deferral to Congress builds a wall against cowboy military adventures in the future.

While Cameron Defers to Parliament, Obama Locks Into Warfare State of Mind

Norman Solomon | Posted 10.30.2013 | Politics
Norman Solomon

The British Parliament's rejection of an attack on Syria is a direct contrast -- and implicit challenge -- to the political war system of the United States. Now all eyes turn to Congress, where the bar has suddenly been raised.

The Spread of Tolerance

John Feffer | Posted 10.14.2013 | World
John Feffer

If it bleeds, it leads. That's the slogan in the newspaper business. War, crime, disaster: these are big sellers. But the spread of tolerance is, for the most part, not newsworthy.

Yugoslavia Could Have Been a Leader

John Feffer | Posted 07.01.2013 | World
John Feffer

It's not surprising, given its relative material wealth and relative freedom, that Yugoslavia was first in line of all the Communist states for consideration as a member of the European Community.