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What the Hell Is Persian Food? Here Are the Dishes You Should Know

12/26/2013 12:11 pm ET | Updated Feb 25, 2014

2013-12-26-persian.jpg Iran has just broken bread with the US for the first time since the Revolution of 1979, so it's about time to learn what the hell that broken Persian bread tastes like. But before you start worrying about etiquette or customs or language (which you can learn via a podcast from that nice woman holding the food), it's way more delicious to just learn about what's on the plate. So here are the dishes that every Persian knows and loves, so you can learn them, and make Persians want to know and love you.

2013-12-26-persian1.jpg CREDIT: Louisa Shafia Fesenjoon Translation: None Ingredients: Stewed pomegranate puree, ground walnuts, chopped onions, chunks of poultry or balls of ground meat. What's the deal: Pomegranates were a big deal in Iran long before Westerners realized they were Wonderful. The tart flavor from "the fruit of heaven" combined with savory spices creates one of the most uniquely Persian dishes in the culinary canon -- a seasonal Fall and Winter dish that, when mentioned to an Iranian, will immediately make them think you know much more about their culture than you actually do.

2013-12-26-dish1.jpg CREDIT: Wikipedia/Amin Majidi Ghormeh Sabzi Translation: "Stewed greens" Ingredients: Parsley, spinach, leeks, coriander, kidney beans, dried lemons, dried fenugreek leaves, turmeric-seasoned lamb or beef. What's the deal: Iran's most widely eaten stew, this lumpy green dish is always going to be on the table of any Persian dinner party, while everyone debates whether Iranian National Team striker Reza Ghoochannejhad is overrated.

2013-12-26-kabob.jpg Kabob Translation: Pretty much universal for "meat" Ingredients: Long strips of minced lamb, chicken, or beef grilled over a fire and served alongside charred tomatoes, rice sprinkled with sumac, a parsley salad, and flatbread. What's the deal: We shish you not, this is probably the most beloved dish in Iran and ranges from super-cheap street food to stuff that only the Shahs of Sunset could afford. There are a ton of different varieties where the meat is spiced differently (turmeric for kabab koobideh, saffron for kabab barg) and it's usually accompanied by doogh (see below!) or a soda ordered by color rather than brand name, with black meaning Coke, white for Sprite, and orange for Fanta.