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How Uber-Bloggers Read 600+ RSS Feeds Each Morning

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Uberblogger Robert Scoble is truly one-of-a-kind. For those who don't know, he became famous as a technical evangelist at Microsoft and quickly became their most outspoken and influential blogger. He now interviews people like Bill Gates, and worldwide media reports on his every move. One of his most mindboggling skills is information management. He currently reads 622 RSS feeds a day -- it used to be 1,400 feeds a day!

How the hell does he do it?

I dropped by the Podtech offices in Palo Alto, CA and hung out with Robert to find out. How does he avoid overload and process so much information? In this exclusive 11-minute interview, we answer quite a few burning questions I've wanted to ask since first meeting Robert:

-Which RSS reader does he use and why?
-How does he configure it to save time?
-What are simple keyboard shortcuts anyone can use?
-How does he find and pick feeds?
-How can you catch his eye with your posts?
-How does he use RSS feeds for building relationships?
-How does he use sites like Techmeme/Digg vs. niche blogs?

One thing impresses me about Robert more than all of his credentials: he smiles more than almost anyone I know. All the time! There is much to be learned from the Scobleizer. The ending of the interview -- Robert's last line -- is also not to be missed.

My apologies for the hyperactive camera work, but the whole thing was quite impromptu, and I'm no Spielberg. Just close your eyes and listen if I make you seasick.

[VIDEO embed HTML below, taken from]:

Stay tuned for part II, coming in the next week, which will answer the question: How does Robert Scoble read and organize e-mail? From speeding up Outlook's performance to reverse spam filtering, it's all covered.

In the meantime, for a solid overview of how I cut my e-mail time by about 90 percent, take a peek at my new manifesto on The Low-Information Diet.