The Climate Post: California Governor Calls for Aggressive Emissions Cuts

04/30/2015 10:55 am ET | Updated Jun 30, 2015

California will establish a greenhouse gas reduction target of 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, the state's Gov. Jerry Brown announced Wednesday. The declaration was made just before a speech on the new executive order at the Navigating the American Carbon World Conference in Los Angeles, where participants took to Twitter to reflect on the news. According to Brown's office, the target is the "most aggressive benchmark enacted by any government in North America to reduce dangerous carbon emissions."

"With this order, California sets a very high bar for itself and other states and nations, but it's one that must be reached--for this generation and generations to come," said Brown, whose state already has some of the toughest carbon pollution regulations in the U.S.

The order requires the state to incorporate climate change impacts into its five-year infrastructure plan as well as its planning and investment decisions.

"Four consecutive years of exceptional drought has brought home the harsh reality of rising global temperatures to the communities and businesses of California," said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. "There can be no substitute for aggressive national targets to reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, but the decision today by Governor Brown to set a 40 percent reduction target for 2030 is an example of climate leadership that others must follow."

The commitment aligns with Europe's greenhouse gas target--dedicated ahead of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris later this year. And it is intended to keep the state on track to meet its 2050 target--curbing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent under 1990 levels by 2050.

"Both California and the EU have set the same 2030 reduction targets--40 percent below 1990 levels," said Ashley Lawson, a senior carbon analyst with Thomson Reuters. "However, California's emissions are currently higher than 1990, while Europe's are lower--so Californians will need to work harder to meet the 2030 target, which we estimate will be in the region of 259 million tonnes (44 percent below the 2012 levels)."

Arctic Council Tackles Black Carbon Plan under U.S. Chairmanship

The Arctic Council--formed in 1996 by the eight nations adjacent to the Arctic to collectively manage the region emerging as North Pole ice melts--has formally adopted a policy to monitor and report on black carbon and methane emissions reductions. Black carbon--or soot--is produced by diesel engines, fires and vehicle and aircraft exhaust and is responsible for accelerating the speed of warming in the Arctic. The Framework for Action on Enhanced Black Carbon and Methane Emissions Reductions was signed on the day council leadership officially transitioned from Canada to the United States, which is making addressing climate change "a key pillar" of its chairmanship program.

A nonbinding and voluntary measure, the framework calls on council members to inventory, in the next six months, emissions of black carbon, which result from incomplete burning of fossil fuels, biofuels, and biomass and which one council study estimated to have a warming impact 10 to 100 times greater than black carbon emissions from mid-latitude regions (subscription). The framework also calls on members to assess future emissions and to make suggestions to mitigate black carbon.

"Everybody here has talks about the profound impact that climate change is having on this region," said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the council's meeting in Iqaluit on Canada's Baffin Island. "The framework we've worked together to develop expresses our shared commitment to significantly reduce black carbon and methane emissions, which are two of the most potent greenhouse gases." He added that the framework sets the stage for the council to adopt "an ambitious collective goal on black carbon" by its next ministerial meeting in 2017.

As Kerry promised to make the battle against climate change the first priority of the two-year U.S. council stewardship, Kiribati President Anote Tong urged the council members to refrain from approving development projects that would accelerate global warming, which threatens low-lying Pacific island nations.

House Committee Votes to Delay Climate Rule

In a 28-23 vote largely along party lines, the House Energy and Commerce Committee moved to delay the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's summer release of the Clean Power Plan until all court challenges have been exhausted. It would also allow states to opt out of complying with the rule, which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions (approximately 30 percent by 2030) from existing power plants under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act.

The bill will go to the full House for a vote.

The Climate Post offers a rundown of the week in climate and energy news. It is produced each Thursday by Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.