THE BLOG

5 Ways That Social Media Can Make a Bad Day Worse

02/07/2013 01:35 pm ET | Updated Apr 09, 2013
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We've all done it. We have all had a bad day where someone or something upsets us so much that we need to let out our frustration and disbelief. "How dare that person do this or do that? How dare they!!!" Alright, so maybe we wouldn't say it that way, but something still needs to be said. Right?

Wrong.

Here are my top five reasons why you should not turn to social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) when you're in a bad mood:

5. Posting a status on Facebook about something that ruined your day can only make your day even worse.

So, you've had a rough day. Something didn't go your way and you need to let the world know what that something is. Next thing you know, people start to like your status. Why are they liking your status, you ask? Because you posted it. You decided to let everyone and their mothers know what you're so pissed off about, and they liked it. Maybe your intentions were to just vent about it so people could leave nice comments. But now, you have a group of people who "like" what you're so angry about. Congratulations.

4. "Sub-tweeting" about someone you feel the need to gossip about will leave you feeling unaccomplished.

Someone said or did something that didn't leave a good taste in your mouth, and you want to let them (and everyone else) know how you feel about it. But here's the catch, you're not going to tag them because you rather sub-tweet them. Maybe it resonates well with you that you got what you needed to say off your chest, but just how accomplished will you actually feel? Probably not so much. It's never courageous to speak your mind about someone when that person may never know who it is really about. Want to feel liberated? Tell them to their face.

3. Social media is not your best friend.

Sometimes we tend to forget who we're speaking to. Posting a tweet or status about something personal happens almost every single day. But are we all really that close with all of our Facebook friends and Twitter followers? Most likely not. The truth is, most people do not care about what you're going through. And when you post something about being upset, and no one responds, you might feel even lonelier. We all have that one best friend we can tell anything to. So why not bother them with all of the details about your terrible haircut and awful break up? And if you don't have that person in your life to turn to, call your parents.

2. You're not only feeling worse about yourself after posting how angry you are, you're also being a buzzkill.

There's nothing like being in a great mood and having an even greater day... until you scroll down your Twitter timeline to read tweets about peoples' moments of self-loathing. Wow, what a buzzkill! You also notice someone has been whining all day or all week about the same damn thing. UNFOLLOW. I'm sure you weren't the first one to click that unfollow button either. To everyone who has been "that person" that tweets about every little negative thing, please do us all a favor and delete your Twitter account. That's what a diary is for.

1. If your profile is not private, then EVERYONE can see what you're posting. Yes, that includes your future boss.

Nothing says inadequate like someone who can't handle a bad situation. Companies want to see people who thrive through rough times. They want to know that the person they are potentially hiring is able to work through anything without crying about it. If you're in a pickle, and you decide to post about it... chances are, you won't find the answer through tweeting the problem. And greater chances are, everyone now knows how easily you fall under pressure to deal with life and its many every day issues. Find alternative ways and you will find an answer, and maybe even a job!

I hope the next time we find ourselves in a moment of trouble, we turn to a new and better way to handle our anger. And if you haven't learned anything from this, you will only be left with less social media friends. I might be a little too honest, but I rather be Frank than be a Debbie downer.