GREEN
11/30/2008 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Secretary Of Energy In McCain's Cabinet?

Republican California Governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger has been mentioned as a potential candidate for Secretary of Energy in a McCain administration or some say maybe even in an Obama administration. According to Grist:

California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) is termed out as California governor in 2010, can't be president because he wasn't born in the United States, and is looking for greener pastures. He's got megawatt star power and hands-on experience crafting an ambitious climate plan.

"I can't think of a better energy czar than Arnold Schwarzenegger," said DiPeso of Republicans for Environmental Protection. He said that while the "Governator" could run for the Senate, "I don't think he'd be interested. He's the sort of guy who likes to be in charge. ... The best job for the Terminator is to hold a high-level executive position. He's demonstrated an interest in the issue, and he's got the policy right. There wouldn't be any on-the-job training there. He's done the bipartisan cracking of heads and gotten people together."

The governor even previously commented on the possibility of serving as Obama's Secretary of Energy:

That apparently prompted George Stephanopoulos, the moderator of "This Week," to ask Mr. Schwarzenegger whether he would take a phone call from Mr. Obama if he was calling with an offer to be his energy and environment czar.

"I'd take his call now, and I'd take his call when he's president -- any time," Mr. Schwarzenegger said. "Remember, no matter who is president, I don't see this as a political thing. I see this as we always have to help, no matter what the administration is."

From Arnold Schwarzenegger's bio:

Governor Schwarzenegger's most notable accomplishments in his first five years in office include the nation-leading Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006--" a bipartisan agreement to combat global warming by reducing California's greenhouse gas emissions â€" and overhauling the state's workers' compensation system - cutting costs by more than 35 percent.