CHICAGO
12/01/2011 12:46 pm ET

Leonore Ulaszek, Hoffman Estates Teacher, Quits After Being Caught Living With Student

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A suburban Chicago high school teacher has resigned after school officials found out that she had been living with a male student.

Leonore Ulaszek, 36, was removed from her Hoffman Estates High School classroom in September and submitted her resignation in November, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Ulaszek reportedly began tutoring a minor male student last year, NBC Chicago reports. The tutoring began in the classroom, eventually moving to a restaurant and then at Ulaszek's apartment. When the student's mother discussed plans to move out of the district, Ulaszek allegedly suggested that the student live with her, as to not disrupt his academic progress.

Though Ulaszek was not charged with a crime, Hoffman Estates police told the Tribune they were investigating the incident. The Department of Children and Family Services also investigated the case, and reportedly uncovered "substantiated claims of abuse and neglect."

The Tribune has more on Ulaszek's alleged misconduct:

Responding to a Freedom of Information Act request, district officials revealed Tuesday they were notified on the evening of Sept. 13 that a social worker had received a report the teacher was living with a male student. Officials will not disclose the age or grade level of the student, who is a minor.

The next day, officials reported the accusations to Hoffman Estates police and placed the teacher on leave, barring her from having any contact with students, said Superintendent Nancy Robb. The "emergency suspension" the teacher later received is a disciplinary tactic used when an employee is accused of "threatened or actual" sexual impropriety or physical harm to a student, according to district policy.

According to CBS Chicago, Ulaszek denied any sexual relationship with the minor student, and told district officials she only gave him hugs before bed.

"Everyone is very surprised. This was a very covert thing … no one knew about it," Superintendent Nancy Robb told the Tribune. "She has been an excellent teacher."

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