ENVIRONMENT

Dead Fish From Molasses Spill Will Be Turned Into Fertilizer

Various kinds of dead marine life collected by  employees from the PENCO Pacific Environmental Corporation can been seen in t
Various kinds of dead marine life collected by employees from the PENCO Pacific Environmental Corporation can been seen in this barrel on the dock fronting the La Mariana Sailing Club in Keehi Lagoon Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, in Honolulu. A pipe maintained by Matson Navigation Co. at pier 52 cracked and leaked about 233,000 gallons of molasses into the harbor. The molasses spill is being blamed for the killing of marine life at Keehi Lagoon which is located near the Honolulu Harbor. The cracked pipe has been repaired and the molasses leak stopped. (AP Photo/Eugene Tanner)

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade, and when it gives you 26,000 dead fish, make fertilizer.

The fish victims of the Honolulu Harbor molasses spill are getting a second life as fertilizer for local farmers on multiple Hawaiian islands, according to KITV.

The fish had originally been frozen and kept as evidence for the multiple investigations regarding the spill. When the carcasses were no longer needed, the Hawaii Department of Health contacted Island Commodities, a meat and fish scrap processing plant on Oahu.

The plant cooks the fish to produce a fuel that is then turned into fertilizer. John Tsukada of lsland Commodities told KITV that the fertilizer will likely be sold to ginger farmers on Kauai, banana and papaya farmers on Hawaii Island and local farmers on Oahu as well.

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