MEDIA
12/12/2014 09:42 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

Washington Post Photojournalist Michel Du Cille Has Died, But His Stories Live On

Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post photojournalist Michel du Cille died Thursday while on assignment in Liberia to cover the Ebola crisis. But the images he captured, and the stories that he told, possess the ability to impact the lives of others for years to come.

The Post mourned the death of its colleague on Thursday, praising du Cille for his ability to capture "dramatic images of human struggle and triumph" as "one of the world’s most accomplished photographers."

"Michel died at 58 doing the work he loved," Washington Post executive editor Martin Baron said in a statement to staffers.

Du Cille received three Pulitzer Prizes throughout his career. In 1986, with The Miami Herald, he was recognized for his work on Colombia’s Nevado del Ruiz volcano. His coverage of drug culture in Miami earned him another, in 1988. Du Cille won his third, in 2008, along with Washington Post reporters Dana Priest and Anne Hull, for their project on Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Most recently, du Cille traveled to Liberia to chronicle Ebola patients and their caretakers amid the devastating outbreak. Take a look at some of his most powerful work:

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