HUFFINGTON POST
01/12/2015 01:10 pm ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

Before And After Photos Show How Much, And How Little, Haiti Has Changed Since The Quake

Haiti marked the fifth anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake on Monday with church services and ceremonies.

The 7.0-magnitude quake struck in the morning of Jan. 12, 2010, destroying landmarks such as the presidential palace and the Sacre Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. With more than 220,000 people killed, the earthquake was one of the worst natural disasters of modern times.

Gladys Lambard, who lost her husband and sister in the quake, told the Associated Press on Monday that the sadness of the disaster has marked her forever. "This is the anniversary of the day I can never forget," she said.

Haiti is among the poorest countries in the world. More than half of the population lives in crowded slums and up to sixty percent survives on less than $2 a day. It is also one of the nations most at risk of natural disasters.

The before and after photos below serve as a stark reminder of the magnitude of the calamity that struck the country in 2010 and show how much, and how little, Haiti has changed since the quake.


These images show the site of the Sacre Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 14, 2010 and Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show a street in Port-au-Prince on Jan. 14, 2010, two days after the earthquake and the same street on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show the site of the Sacre Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 14, 2010 and the church on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show the site of the Haitian Palace of Justice Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 14, 2010 on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show downtown Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 14, 2010 and on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show downtown Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 14, 2010 and on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images


These images show the site of the Haitian National Palace in Port-au-Prince on Jan. 13, 2010 and on Dec. 29, 2014. Credit: AFP / Getty Images

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