THE BLOG
10/28/2011 09:41 am ET Updated Dec 28, 2011

The Greatest Advice Ever

The greatest advice I ever received was when I entered the 10th grade. It was given to me by my bishop from the church organization I attended and he said, "Whatever you do, you should always do it at the best of your abilities." The advice stuck with me throughout high school because it meant so much. To me it meant that I should aim for the highest point because whether I know it or not there is always someone looking at me with inspiration. This inspired me to reach for the top and fight hard in whatever I did. I aimed for perfection. As a result of my actions, I ended up gaining the attention of my fellow leaders.

At church, I focused on my responsibilities as a young man and I did them to the best of my abilities. My responsibilities consisted of arriving to church early on Sunday mornings in order to set the sacrament for the congregation and to clean up after the sacrament was over. After seeing my good work, the leaders of my church elected me as first counselor to the bishop. My job was to be the head of all the young men, which meant that I was to have them organized and to make notice of who arrived and who didn't. At the start of my duties, I decided to just let everything take care of themselves. As you probably guessed, that did not turn out well. Eventually my bishop approached me and said, "Angel, I need you to take your responsibilities seriously." That was the moment that he shared the advice and added "Angel, you should always be a role model," and then he walked away. At that moment, everything I ever did while I was a leader flashed before my eyes and then I realized that I was chosen to lead, not to just sit and watch the world slowly go by. The following Sunday, I arrived an hour early in order to set sacrament. I also started to check up on the attendance of the other young men and checking up on their activities, I was at the top of my game.

A month later, the bishop approached me and he said "Angel, I and proud of you, this means a lot to me." That moment changed my life forever. It showed me that hard work is not valuable for a rise in position or pay, but it gives us a felling that is worth more than life itself. It sort of tingles as it runs from our forehead down to our feet and fills our heart with warmth. That's what makes life worth living and that is the ingredient of a perfect leader. His advice gave me inspiration and it gave me a goal, therefore I am the leader I am today. I strongly believe that if you put hard work into all that you do, there will always be someone out there who will notice your hard work and will eventually begin to admire you.