THE BLOG
09/24/2009 05:12 am ET Updated Nov 17, 2011

Too Sensitive? Try Emotional Freedom

I'd like to have lunch with Judith Orloff.

Her latest book, Emotional Freedom, is a gift to those of us who are often called "too sensitive." Dr. Orloff is a psychiatrist and an intuitive, a self-described energy psychiatrist (I have to applaud her for that alone!) and her passion in life has been integrating the two rather than choosing one or the other. Take it from an intuitive, she's done a very, very good job of it.

One of the things I thoroughly enjoyed about her book is that Dr. Judith uses stories from her own life and her own spiritual process to explain that she, like the rest of us, is working on emotional freedom. She describes what she calls "arthritic coping skills," meaning old ways of reacting to life's experiences.

Oh do I know what she means! In 27 years of spiritual counseling, I've seen all sorts of us use old coping methods that no longer work. This book is a serious upgrade. She addresses dreaming, and how to use it for growth. She speaks to emotional vampires--those people who are a drain on your energy and how to both disempower them, and learn from them.

Dr. Orloff's stance is distinctly spiritual and thoroughly grounded in everyday reality. She uses her medical training to support her spiritual orientation. I envy her patients. They have the best of both worlds in Dr. Judith.

Part Two of the book is all about tools for liberation--practical, real, apply-now tools that anyone who is committed to their own growth can use to instant advantage. Dr. Judith knows the secret of relationship; she knows that we attract those things which are unresolved in ourselves. To know this fact is liberating in itself! There is no blame for what we attract; no, there are only things to learn and grow through.

These chapters pair positives and negatives in a very useful way. Consider these from her chapter headings: Fear and Courage, Frustration/Disappointment and Patience, Loneliness and Connection, Anxiety/Worry and Inner Calm, Depression and Hope, Jealousy/Envy and Self-Esteem, Anger and Compassion.

In each of these chapters, the bulk of the book, Dr. Judith teaches us how to work through the emotions on four levels: biological, spiritual, energetic and psychological. By approaching these feelings from so many different perspectives, she deftly addresses the disparate approaches to them in all different human beings. For example, I tend to experience fear somatically. My tummy gets riled up, I breathe shallowly, I become hugely critical. By giving me tools to address the biology of fear, my somatic responses have lessened, a good lesson (pun intended) learned.

Because I was invited to review Dr. Orloff's book, I read it carefully. I need to cop to the fact that I probably would not have bought the book myself. I deal with the emotions of human beings all the time, and I have my own experience to rely on. No matter, I'm so glad I read her book.

Consider this opening sentence to her final chapter and you'll know why: "Emotional freedom is an inner peace movement that is birthed from within each one of us, then emanates into the world. The starting place is always you. The more peace you enjoy, the more that energy ripples out to everyone." And there you have it! This is why emotional freedom is to be desired by all of us--because it contributes to the cause nearest and dearest to my own heart, inner peace.

She goes on, "Advocates for peace must know what it is to feel peaceful." Amen!

And, "Emotional freedom tilts the tipping point toward goodness. It allows us to experience inner peace so that outer peace can prosper." She is so right on.

Dr. Judith, how's next Wednesday for that lunch?

For spiritual nourishment, go to www.susancorso.com.