Enjoying the Now: How Disconnecting Increases Wisdom & Well-Being 

11/04/2016 04:12 pm ET

In our world today, there is absolutely no shortage of technology. No matter where you turn, there seems to be a new piece of technology that is changing the way we interact with the world around us. While so many organizations are trying to promote new ways for us to get in touch with technology, there is no better time than the present to take a moment and to disconnect, even if it is only for a moment. You may be surprised by just how much you can benefit from this type of disconnect.

Challenge yourself to start disconnecting. It will help you enjoy the world around you, while improving your wisdom and well-being. Whether you have you face buried in a cell phone, or not, the world is going to continue to move forward around you. Start making the most out of it and disconnect. Here are just a few ways it can improve your wisdom and well-being.

It will help you avoid FOMO.

The term FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) is used quite a bit in our world today. While many people assume it is a pop-culture reference FOMO is actually a real emerging psychological disorder. Plus, researchers have found that it is brought on by the advance of technology.

With social media right at our fingertips at all times, we are connected to everything that is going on with our friends in the world around us, creating a growing feeling of being “left out” among our peers. There have also been studies on the emotional effect that Facebook can have on people, finding that over 33% of individuals felt dissatisfied with their lives after getting on Facebook.

Turn off social media and start gaining some more insight into the world around you. Instead of focusing on what others are posting about their lives, you can start enjoying the real world around you.

It will help you gain wisdom about the world.

If you want to truly learn about the world around you and gain real experiences, then you need to remove your head from your phone and away from your tablet and start looking at and experience what is actually happening in your life. Pictures and images of some of the best things that the world has to offer only go so far. If you really want to gain wisdom then you need to start experiencing the world.

When you think about how much time you spend surfing the internet or checking social media every day and you add that time up, how much do you think you spend in a week? Think of all of the ways that you could use that time to explore somewhere new, visit a museum, get in touch with nature, volunteer, or reach out and connect with someone important in your life. Don’t let life pass you by just because you want to experience the latest technology at your fingertips 24/7.

It can highlight your addiction.

Most people today do not realize that they are addicted to technology. However, technological addiction is a very real and a very serious problem in our world today.

In fact, according to a study by Pew Research Center, around 84% of cell phone users say they cannot go a single day without using their device. While BI Intelligence states that around 88% of consumers actually watch their mobile screen, while watching television. That is a great deal of screen time.

A 2010 study by the University of Maryland even found that many millennials actually described their dependence on the Internet in the same way people describe their addictions to drugs and alcohol.

You may not be aware that you are struggling with a technology addiction until you try to go without your favorite devices. Try to unplug and see first-hand whether or not you have developed a dependence on your most used pieces of technology.

We all use technology each and every day, in one capacity or another. However, instead of inundating your brain with even more technology, give your mind a break and disconnect. Powering down for just one hour per day can make all the difference. It can help you enjoy the present and really take in some of the best that this world has to offer.

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