POLITICS

White Supremacist EMT Suspended After Neo-Nazi Podcast Surfaces

Alex McNabb was suspended two days after HuffPost reported that he was under investigation in Virginia.

Alex McNabb, a prominent white supremacist, was suspended without pay from his emergency medical technician job in Virginia following a HuffPost report exposing his neo-Nazi podcast.

McNabb’s employer, Jeb Stuart Volunteer Rescue Squad, confirmed to CNN that the EMT would be on unpaid leave as the state Department of Health investigated comments he made on the neo-Nazi podcast he frequently co-hosts, “The Daily Shoah.”

On Saturday, HuffPost revealed that McNabb, an EMT in Patrick County, was under investigation by the state after an anonymous complaint was lodged against him on Nov. 26. On Monday, he was placed on unpaid leave, according to CNN

Because the investigation is “open and active,” the Virginia Department of Health’s Office of Emergency Medical Services didn’t describe the nature of the complaint to HuffPost. But the timing of his suspension is telling ― prior to HuffPost’s report, the office said he wouldn’t be suspended and that the investigation could last up to 60 days.

An attorney for Jeb Stuart told CNN that he warned against firing the EMT right away, for fear of lawsuits. Its board will decide McNabb’s future pending the results of the state’s investigation, but it wasn’t immediately clear when a decision would be made.

“We’ll cooperate [with the state],” said the attorney, Wren Williams. “I’ve cautioned against firing him outright yet because we don’t want to be sued for wrongful termination.”

On “The Daily Shoah,” McNabb plays the role of a racist character he calls “Dr. Narcan” and tells stories about his time as an EMT alongside his neo-Nazi guests. He calls black patients “dindus,” a slur, and compares black patients to animals.

“It’s hard to find a dindu vein anyway, because they’re black,” he said during one episode.

In a statement sent to HuffPost over Twitter, McNabb wrote that “Doctor Narcan is a work of fiction.”

On Twitter, McNabb likened recent news reports about him to “character assassination” and implied that the hospital he works at, as well as his overwhelmingly white rural community of Patrick County, is suffering due to his absence.

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