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08/19/2018 06:36 pm ET

Ariana Grande Brought To Tears While Discussing Anxiety, Manchester Bombing

"We just have to be there for each other as much as we can," the pop star said during an emotional interview.

Ariana Grande broke down in tears Friday during a radio interview that touched on mental health and the May 2017 bombing of her concert in Manchester, England.

The 25-year-old pop star became visibly emotional when discussing “Get Well Soon,” a track off her new album “Sweetener,” during an appearance on Apple’s “Beats 1.”

“It’s just about just being there for each other and helping each other through scary times and, like, anxiety,” Grande said through tears. “Some dark shit out there, man. We just have to be there for each other as much as we can ’cause you never fucking know.”

Grande acknowledged struggling with “personal demons” and anxiety in the wake of the attack, which left 22 people dead and over 130 others injured. She wrote “Get Well Soon” to “give people a hug musically” and to make people “feel good and less alone,” she said.

“Mental health is so important,” said Grande, who has been open about seeing a therapist. “People don’t pay enough mind to it because we have things to do, schedules, we have jobs, we have kids, and places to be and pressure to fit in. ... People gotta be nicer.”

The “Side to Side” singer opened up about her decision to continue her Dangerous Woman world tour just a couple of weeks after the bombing and refusing to let fear dictate her life.

“You want to keep going,” Grande said. “You want to just not be afraid because, of course, that’s what they want. If you give them that, then they’ve won. ... But the truth is, is that it’s fucking scary. ... It’s scary and this is some real shit. You don’t want to give in, you don’t want to be afraid, but it’s still there.”

If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HOME to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line. Outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of resources.

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