GOOD NEWS
10/06/2017 05:29 pm ET Updated Nov 02, 2017

Carpenter Drives 2,000 Miles To Deliver Handmade Crosses For Las Vegas Victims

"This row of crosses will show the severity of what really happened there."

Greg Zanis is honoring the lives lost during the mass shooting in Las Vegas in his own beautiful way.

The 66-year-old retired carpenter crafted a cross for each of the 58 victims, drove them nearly 2,000 miles from his home in the suburbs of Chicago and installed them on the Las Vegas Strip on Thursday, the Associated Press reports.

Fifty-eight white crosses for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting stand on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip, Octo
Drew Angerer via Getty Images
Fifty-eight white crosses for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting stand on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip, October 5, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The crosses, each adorned with a heart, will remain on a patch of grass by the iconic “Welcome to Las Vegas” sign for 40 days and then will be given to the victims’ families.

“This row of crosses will show the severity of what really happened there. More so than numbers and pictures in the paper,” he told WGN News, a Chicago-based news channel.

With the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in the background (at right), 58 white crosses for the victims of Sunday night's mass
Drew Angerer via Getty Images
With the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in the background (at right), 58 white crosses for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting stand on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip, October 5, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. 

Zanis is known for this particular kind of tribute and has created crosses for the victims of mass shootings such as Columbine, Sandy Hook and the Orlando Pulse nightclub massacre. Over the past two decades he has erected more than 20,000 crosses. 

Mourners decorate the crosses. 
Denise Truscello via Getty Images
Mourners decorate the crosses. 

His first was a commemoration for his father-in-law, who was killed 20 years ago.

Melissa Gerber (L) and Sandra Serralde (R) comfort each other beside 58 white crosses.
ROBYN BECK via Getty Images
Melissa Gerber (L) and Sandra Serralde (R) comfort each other beside 58 white crosses.

“That just changed my life,” Zanis told the AP. “My first cross was for somebody that I loved. And when I put up these crosses here, I always think of my personal loss here too. Always.”

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