HUFFINGTON POST

These Reactions To The Paris Attacks Will Inspire You

People around the world are restoring our faith in humanity.

As the world reels over Friday's deadly attacks in Paris, people around the world have performed heartwarming acts of kindness.

Immediately after the tragedy, Parisians opened up their homes to host survivors and stranded people. Outside the Bataclan, German-Italian pianist Davide Martello performed John Lennon's "Imagine" to mourners the day after the atrocities. International tech companies also waived fees for their services in France.

Take a look at some more inspiring reactions to the tragedies below.

  • Hashtag Allows People To Seek Refuge During Attacks
    People living in Paris&nbsp;used the&nbsp;hashtag&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paris-france-terrorist-at
    Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images
    People living in Paris used the hashtag #PorteOuverte or "#OpenDoor" on social media to offer housing to people stranded in the city as the attacks unfurled on Nov. 13. Sylvain Lapoix, a French journalist who started the hashtag, told French television Monday he was not a hero: "I helped people help others, that's all."
  • Shakespeare And Company Bookstore Houses 20 Customers During Night Of Attacks
    The historic Shakespeare and Company bookstore <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/customers-terror-shakespeare-co-b
    Marc Piasecki/FilmMagic/Getty Images
    The historic Shakespeare and Company bookstore housed 20 customers as they waited out the attacks.
  • Pianist Plays 'Imagine' Outside Bataclan Theater
    <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/man-plays-imagine-bataclan_56474e47e4b0603773493f58?utm_hp_ref=whats-working">Ge
    Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images
    German pianist Davide Martello wheeled a piano outside the Bataclan theater on Saturday, where one of the attacks took place, and played John Lennon's song "Imagine," about world peace.
  • People Of All Faiths Unite To Support Muslims
    As France's Muslim community braced itself for a possible backlash after the attacks, thousands of citizens organized <a href
    Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images
    As France's Muslim community braced itself for a possible backlash after the attacks, thousands of citizens organized interfaith gatherings and rallies across the country. In the UK, a mosque in London also launched an Islam Awareness Course to educate both non-Muslims and Muslims about Islamic culture and history. And in Bethesda, Maryland, Muslim, Jewish and Christian leaders jointly hosted a service to unite in solidarity.
  • Airbnb, Skype and Google Hangouts Offer Services To Paris For Free
    Over the weekend, home-renting service Airbnb <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/companies-help-paris_5648cc00e4b08
    Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images
    Over the weekend, home-renting service Airbnb urged its hosts to house victims and stranded people for free. Skype and Google Hangouts also made all calls to France free.
  • Facebook Allows Users To Mark Themselves 'Safe' During Attacks
    Facebook enabled its "<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paris-attack-facebook-safety-check_56467b13e4b060377349276
    David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images
    Facebook enabled its "Safety Check" feature, which allowed users near the Paris terrorist attacks to let their friends know they were safe.
  • Friends Of Victim's Sister Crowdfunds Her Flight Back To France
    After learning&nbsp;that the sister of Jenny Boissinot, a French woman traveling in New Zealand, had lost her sister to the t
    Geoffroy Van der Hasselt/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
    After learning that the sister of Jenny Boissinot, a French woman traveling in New Zealand, had lost her sister to the terror attacks, people around the world crowdfunded her flight home.
  • Children Express Themselves Through Art
    A French mother who lives near the scene of the Paris attacks invited her children and others from the neighborhood to <a hre
    Marie S. Boivin
    A French mother who lives near the scene of the Paris attacks invited her children and others from the neighborhood to draw their emotions --  "I offer a kind of meditation through art," Kaoru Watanabe told HuffPost France. In New York, teachers at the Léman Manhattan Preparatory School also encouraged students to express their feelings about the attacks through art.
  • Wembley Stadium Unites To Sing French National Anthem At Soccer Game
    Four days after the attacks,&nbsp;English and French soccer fans united to <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/franc
    Matthew Ashton - AMA/Getty Images
    Four days after the attacks, English and French soccer fans united to sing the French national anthem before a game between the two countries.
  • Mashable Creates Twitter Account Honoring Victims
    Digital media website Mashable <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mashable-creates-twitter-account-honoring-paris-a
    Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images
    Digital media website Mashable created a Twitter account displaying photos and details about victims of the attacks. The Twitter handle is called @ParisVictims and the account named "En mémoire," or "In Memory."
  • Paris Attackers' Neighborhood Holds Candlelight Vigil For Victims
    Hundreds of people held a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paris-attack-molenbeek-belgium-vigil_564cb087e4b08c74b
    Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
    Hundreds of people held a candlelight vigil in the Molenbeek neighborhood in Brussels, Belgium, to honor victims. At least two of the Paris attackers lived in the neighborhood and Mohamed Abdeslam, the brother of two assailants, took part in the vigil.
  • Crowdfunding Sites Collect Donations For Victims' Families
    French crowdfunding websites <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/help-families-paris-attack-victims_564e0faee4b08c74
    Bilal Muftuoglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
    French crowdfunding websites call on users to donate money to the families of some of the victims of the Paris attacks, such as Hodda Saadi and Antoine Leiris.
  • Children Of 9/11 Victims Share Messages of Support
    Vox/YouTube
    The children of Sept. 11, 2011 victims record messages of support to people who lost loved ones in the Paris attacks. "We know what anger and hatred looks like, and we can't add to that anymore," a woman said.

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