WEIRD NEWS
09/30/2015 01:29 pm ET

Mom? Dad? I'm Dead ... Here Are My Tattoos

This takes "leaving your mark" to a whole new level.

When you think "family heirloom," it's natural to think of Grandpa's pocket watch or Grandma's engagement ring, but what about Uncle Jim's Bugs Bunny tattoo?

Sure, it was once on ole-Jim's calf, but now it can be framed, mounted and proudly displayed above your fireplace, for when you remember him on Christmas Eve. 

NAPSA / SaveMyInk.com

NAPSA -- the National Association for the Preservation of Skin Art -- launched earlier this month with the aim of helping you pass down your tattoos to your kids, grandkids, and  loved ones. It's no longer a morbid dream. You can have your tattoos removed, preserved and turned into fine art.

NAPSA prides itself on "saving your legacy" and caters to those who "don't want to be defined by others," according to its website.

In a nine-step guide for how to preserve your skin, potential derma-bequeathers are advised to make a profile on the NAPSA site. Essentially, they ask that you write up a tattoo will.

After that, NAPSA recommends you tell everyone your plans for your posthumous skin removal so that, when you die, your loved ones won't be totally horrified that you're leaving them your skin. 

NAPSA / SaveMyInk.com

Then, when you die, your "Final Wish Beneficiary" has to give NAPSA notice within 18 hours. NAPSA will send over a "preservation kit, containing instructions and all the necessary equipment to recover, temporarily preserve, and safely ship your tattoo to NAPSA, mailed overnight to the recovery provider (In most cases, your funeral home)."

Once NAPSA receives your tat, your family can expect to receive your beautiful, non-decaying piece of skin in an ornate frame three to six months later. 

Having just launched on Sept. 18, we were curious what the sign-up rate is looking like and if anyone's ordered a preservation kit just yet. 

"We have not had anyone pass away yet and we have had several people sign up since launching," NAPSA PR rep Michelle Venorsky told HuffPost in an email.

So, if you've grown to love your aunt's drunken mistake of a doughnut tattoo and you don't want it to disappear as her body decays underground, have her sign up for NAPSA! Let her legacy live on and get yourself a piece of wall art in the process.

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