THE BLOG
12/17/2014 02:09 pm ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

Disney to 'Frozen' Fans: 'Let it Code'

I have a friend who is as obsessed with Frozen as her young daughter. They must have seen it over a dozen times already and I've lost count as to how many text conversations we've had about how the pair have bonded over the film.

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A very recent text exchange from said friend

The animated hit brought in over $1 billion worldwide at the box office and is still a driving force behind toy sales this Christmas. Why Hollywood isn't clamoring to make more movies moms and daughters can bond over is beyond me. But at least the people over at Disney Interactive have employed Anna and Elsa for another important adventure -- to teach kids to code.

It's a fantastic idea. I've never seen so many young girls want to be like these characters, and if Anna and Elsa can code then I'll bet their young fans (and maybe their parents) will want to as well.

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Photo courtesy of Disney Interactive

Disney partnered with Code.org for an "Hour of Code," where kids learn how to write code that enables Disney Infinity versions of Anna and Elsa to draw snowflakes and snowmen and perform magical "ice craft." The tutorial teaches logic, math and creative thinking.

"For us we see it as a way to connect kids to how they can be creative through technology," Nicole Rustad tells me. Rustad is Disney Interactive's director of corporate citizenship.

"From Code.org, the definitely want to increase the number of kids from all different backgrounds in coding because there's traditionally been mostly Caucasian men involved in technology," says Rustad. "We want to promote that and have diversity continue."

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Photo courtesy of Disney Interactive

The tutorial has been translated into 30 different languages and is aimed at the tween and teen set.

"We want to inspire kids to be creative through technology so they can see it as another way to create things that could either be a fun game or something that could actually change the world," says Rustad. "We think it's the first stepping stone to going down the path of getting seriously involved in technology."