THE BLOG
05/31/2016 12:31 pm ET Updated Jun 01, 2017

I Don't Want to Learn to Manage Millennials!

Getty Images

I get it. You are a very good manager -- even great at times. You care about your direct reports and have taken the time to hone your skills.

Your employees like you and feel supported. Plus, you've been around the block plenty of times -- you know your stuff.

And in all these years, you've never had any complaints! So why should you have to make changes for this generation?

After all, when you were starting out -- no one made any changes for you. YOU had to change to fit in and you did. You not only fit in, you thrived. You met and exceeded expectations time and time again.

And now you have earned the right to expect the next generation to do the same. Shouldn't they figure out how the game is being played and start moving their piece around the board? They should be looking at the people who are winning and following suit!

But they are not doing that.

They are asking questions first before they even roll the dice! They seem to care more about where they are going than whether they beat out the competition. They are interested in enjoying the game and would like to know more about the benefits of playing.

Do we really have the energy to keep up with all the changes being brought about by this group of employees and should we go out of our way to accommodate them? Aren't we kind of "giving in" if we try to change the game completely to suit their wishes and needs?

Maybe there is a compromise to be made? What if by learning some simple coaching tools and integrating them with the management skills you already have, you could become a better manager for all age groups?

So many of the tools that managers are now being taught as effective skills for managing millennials, are simply "Effective Management 101." All age groups would rather have a manager that knows how to listen, give clear feedback and acknowledge appropriately than a dictator or a manager that employs a "milk-toast" approach.

Rather than "giving in" to learning new skills to manage millennials, how about we simply hone managerial skills that we know work - no matter the generation?

Sure, the game may change. The board may have some new stops along the way. But you will find that you enjoy playing so much more when all players enjoy the benefits of your management mastery.

3 Tips for Playing the Game:

  • Identify 1 small change you are willing to make to your managerial approach.
  • Identify 1 small request you want to make of your millennial direct reports.
  • Commit to making both small changes this week and take note of the results.

Small changes yield big results!

If you have 30 minutes, you can learn 5 Simple Tools that will make managing all age groups easier, including millennials! Click here to download the webinar immediately.