THE BLOG
12/15/2014 04:31 pm ET Updated Feb 13, 2015

A Ray of Hope for the Holidays and Beyond

Typically I don't care to exploit my personal plights with my now several diseases or wear them on my sleeve, but this year I am compelled to do so.

I began this "ordeal" back in July of 1994, basically just a naive young lady with a diagnosis of Stage 0-1 IDC Invasive Ductal Carcinoma cancer in the duct linings of the breast. To this day I don't know how I got to Stage IV these 20 years later but I do have one theory.

My prognosis at the time was more than outstanding, a tiny encapsulated tumor (in situ) which means in it's original place, no node involvement and clear margins around the tumor and NO reason to ever become Stage IV. I can only surmise with all the information I have compiled about this disease over the years, that during surgery the tumor must have been exposed and opened. This would have allowed the cancer cells to migrate directly to the blood stream inadvertently landing itself into my sacrum, dormant for 10 years.

In the past three years I also developed Diabetes Type II, Hepatitis C and just last month a real surprise for the holidays, Multiple Myeloma. A totally new cancer has found it's way into my blood plasma which produces antibodies to fight off infections and what a biopsy that was! My assumption here is that there are no stats for those living past five years with just breast cancer. I believe these other invaders happen with time preying on the already weakened immune system. So it would seem logical yet abhorring that they would indeed encroach upon such a weakened system.

In the meantime I shall continue on my way as I have and hopefully more will be living longer. Perhaps then we can learn the dichotomy between these diseases and siege them before they can cause havoc.

Folks constantly tell me I'm a fighter or battling so bravely the diseases I have incurred along the way. I have never ever considered this a fight or battle. I don't comprehend doing battle with an intangible situation, yet a very painful one. The battleground is in fact my own body; it needs loving and caressing and nurturing, not a fight. I have very little control over these disorders and sadly I am finding very few treatments that have control either. My obligation to myself and others in my situation is to stay informed, be diligent, go with your gut feeling -- even at the cost of another oncologist. Always, always get other opinions. I am on oncologist number 17 -- still here to tell about it.

This has been no easy road for one individual to carry, somehow keeping hope has been a priority. It goes without saying that these infidels that have attacked my body have also made one acrimonious human being. Never the less I shall remain hopeful and we must all be to get us through our unfortunate situations.

At this season of holidays and miracles may I continue to be a source of inspiration and "Ray of Hope" in the lives of multitudes suffering from so many of these arduous and most serious diseases. Hope lasting far beyond any holiday and who knows we just might find a long overdue miracle as well.

Sincere wishes for a renewed and healthier season now and always!

Until next time,

Peace,

N~